Obesity and Falls in a Prospective Study of Older Men: The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study

Elizabeth R. Hooker, Smriti Shrestha, Christine Lee, Peggy M. Cawthon, Melanie Abrahamson, Kris Ensrud, Marcia L. Stefanick, Thuy Tien Dam, Lynn Marshall, Eric Orwoll, Carrie Nielson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate fall rates across body mass index (BMI) categories by age group, considering physical performance and comorbidities. Method: In the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study, 5,834 men aged ≥65 reported falls every 4 months over 4.8 (±0.8) years. Adjusted associations between BMI and an incident fall were tested using mixed-effects models. Results: The fall rate (0.66/man-year overall, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.65, 0.67]) was lowest in the youngest, normal weight men (0.44/man-year, 95% CI = [0.41, 0.47]) and greatest in the oldest, highest BMI men (1.47 falls/man-year, 95% CI = [1.22, 1.76]). Obesity was associated with a 24% to 92% increased fall risk in men below 80 (ptrend ≤.0001, p for interaction by age =.03). Only adjustment for dynamic balance test altered the BMI-falls association substantially. Discussion: Obesity was independently associated with higher fall rates in men 65 to 80 years old. Narrow walk time, a measure of gait stability, may mediate the association.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1235-1250
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume29
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

Osteoporotic Fractures
Obesity
Prospective Studies
confidence
Body Mass Index
Confidence Intervals
comorbidity
age group
incident
Gait
Comorbidity
interaction
Age Groups
performance
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • BMI
  • falls
  • obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology
  • Community and Home Care
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Obesity and Falls in a Prospective Study of Older Men : The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study. / Hooker, Elizabeth R.; Shrestha, Smriti; Lee, Christine; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Abrahamson, Melanie; Ensrud, Kris; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Dam, Thuy Tien; Marshall, Lynn; Orwoll, Eric; Nielson, Carrie.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, Vol. 29, No. 7, 01.10.2017, p. 1235-1250.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hooker, ER, Shrestha, S, Lee, C, Cawthon, PM, Abrahamson, M, Ensrud, K, Stefanick, ML, Dam, TT, Marshall, L, Orwoll, E & Nielson, C 2017, 'Obesity and Falls in a Prospective Study of Older Men: The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study', Journal of Aging and Health, vol. 29, no. 7, pp. 1235-1250. https://doi.org/10.1177/0898264316660412
Hooker, Elizabeth R. ; Shrestha, Smriti ; Lee, Christine ; Cawthon, Peggy M. ; Abrahamson, Melanie ; Ensrud, Kris ; Stefanick, Marcia L. ; Dam, Thuy Tien ; Marshall, Lynn ; Orwoll, Eric ; Nielson, Carrie. / Obesity and Falls in a Prospective Study of Older Men : The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study. In: Journal of Aging and Health. 2017 ; Vol. 29, No. 7. pp. 1235-1250.
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