Not so implausible

impact of longitudinal assessment of implausible anthropometric measures on obesity prevalence and weight change in children and adolescents

Janne Heinonen, Carrie J. Tillotson, Jean P. O'Malley, Miguel Marino, Sarah B. Andrea, Andrew Brickman, Jennifer Devoe, Jon Puro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Implausible anthropometric measures are typically identified using population outlier definitions, conflating implausible and extreme measures. We determined the impact of a longitudinal outlier approach on prevalence of body mass index (BMI) categories and mean change in anthropometric measures in pediatric electronic health record data. Methods: We examined 996,131 observations from 147,375 children (10–18 years) in the ADVANCE Clinical Data Research Network, a national network of community health centers. Sex-stratified, mixed effects, linear spline regression modeled weight, height, and BMI as a function of age. Longitudinal outliers were defined as observations with studentized residual greater than |6|; population outliers were defined by Centers for Disease Control-defined z-score thresholds. Results: At least 99.7% of anthropometric measures were not extreme by longitudinal or population definitions (agreement ≥ 0.995). BMI category prevalence after excluding longitudinal or population outliers differed by less than 0.1%. Among children greater than 85th percentile at baseline, annual mean changes in anthropometric measures were larger in data that excluded longitudinal (girls: 1.24 inches, 12.39 pounds, 1.53 kg/m 2 ; boys: 2.34, 14.08, 1.07) versus population outliers (girls: 0.61 inches, 8.22 pounds, 0.75 kg/m 2 ; boys: 1.53, 11.61, 0.48). Conclusions: Longitudinal outlier methods may reduce underestimation of anthropometric change in children with elevated baseline values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Obesity
Weights and Measures
Body Mass Index
Population
Community Health Centers
Electronic Health Records
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Linear Models
Pediatrics
Research

Keywords

  • Anthropometry
  • Biologically implausible values
  • Body mass index
  • Longitudinal
  • Obesity
  • Outliers
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Not so implausible : impact of longitudinal assessment of implausible anthropometric measures on obesity prevalence and weight change in children and adolescents. / Heinonen, Janne; Tillotson, Carrie J.; O'Malley, Jean P.; Marino, Miguel; Andrea, Sarah B.; Brickman, Andrew; Devoe, Jennifer; Puro, Jon.

In: Annals of Epidemiology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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