Normative Values of Muscle Power Using Force Plate Jump Tests in Men Aged 77–101 Years: The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study

Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine normative values for weight-bearing, countermovement leg extension (“jump”) tests in the oldest men and characteristics of those not completing vs. completing tests Design: 2014-16 cross-sectional exam. Setting: Six U.S. sites from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study. Participants: Community-dwelling men (N=1,841) aged 84.5±4.2 (range: 77-101) years. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: Jump tests on a force plate measured lower-extremity muscle peak power/kg, velocity and force/kg at peak power, with normative values for 5-year age groups and by limitations in moderate-intensity activities of daily living (ADLs) and climbing several flights of stairs. Results: Jump completion was 68.9% (N=1,268/1,841) and 98% (1,242/1,268) had >1 analyzable trial/participant. Exclusions primarily were due to poor mobility and/or balance: 24.8% (456/1,841) prior to and 6.4% (N=117/1,841) after attempting testing. Peak power was 20.8±5.3 W/kg, with 1.2±0.3 m/s for velocity, and 16.7±1.9 N/kg for force at peak power. Each 5-year age group >80 years had subsequently 10% lower power/kg, with 30% lower power/kg at >90 vs. <80 years (all p<0.05). Velocity and force/kg at peak power were 24% and 9% lower respectively, at >90 vs. <80 years (all p<0.05). Limitations in both moderate ADLs and climbing several flights of stairs were associated with 16% lower age-adjusted power/kg, equivalent to 5–10 years of aging, with 11% and 6% lower age-adjusted velocity and force/ kg respectively, vs. those without limitation (all p<0.05). Men not completing vs. completing jumps had older age, higher BMI, lower physical activity, more comorbidities, worse cognition, more IADLs/ADLs and more falls in the past year (all p<0.05). Post-jump pain occurred in 4.6% (58/1,268), with 2 participants stopping testing due to pain. Only 24/1,242 (2%) had all trials/participant without flight (i.e., inability to lift feet), with 323/1,242 having ≥1 trial/participant without flight (total of 28%). No serious adverse safety events (e.g., injury) occurred. Conclusions: A multicenter cohort of oldest men with a range of function had higher declines in jump power/kg and velocity vs. force/kg across each 5-year age group >80 years. Future research should examine age- and functional-related declines in jump measures related to physical performance decline, falls, fractures, and disability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nutrition, Health and Aging
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 7 2018

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Osteoporotic Fractures
Muscles
Age Groups
Independent Living
Weight-Bearing
Activities of Daily Living
Lower Extremity
Leg

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Normative Values of Muscle Power Using Force Plate Jump Tests in Men Aged 77–101 Years : The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study. / Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Research Group.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, 07.07.2018, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Normative Values of Muscle Power Using Force Plate Jump Tests in Men Aged 77–101 Years: The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study",
abstract = "Objective: To determine normative values for weight-bearing, countermovement leg extension (“jump”) tests in the oldest men and characteristics of those not completing vs. completing tests Design: 2014-16 cross-sectional exam. Setting: Six U.S. sites from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study. Participants: Community-dwelling men (N=1,841) aged 84.5±4.2 (range: 77-101) years. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: Jump tests on a force plate measured lower-extremity muscle peak power/kg, velocity and force/kg at peak power, with normative values for 5-year age groups and by limitations in moderate-intensity activities of daily living (ADLs) and climbing several flights of stairs. Results: Jump completion was 68.9{\%} (N=1,268/1,841) and 98{\%} (1,242/1,268) had >1 analyzable trial/participant. Exclusions primarily were due to poor mobility and/or balance: 24.8{\%} (456/1,841) prior to and 6.4{\%} (N=117/1,841) after attempting testing. Peak power was 20.8±5.3 W/kg, with 1.2±0.3 m/s for velocity, and 16.7±1.9 N/kg for force at peak power. Each 5-year age group >80 years had subsequently 10{\%} lower power/kg, with 30{\%} lower power/kg at >90 vs. <80 years (all p<0.05). Velocity and force/kg at peak power were 24{\%} and 9{\%} lower respectively, at >90 vs. <80 years (all p<0.05). Limitations in both moderate ADLs and climbing several flights of stairs were associated with 16{\%} lower age-adjusted power/kg, equivalent to 5–10 years of aging, with 11{\%} and 6{\%} lower age-adjusted velocity and force/ kg respectively, vs. those without limitation (all p<0.05). Men not completing vs. completing jumps had older age, higher BMI, lower physical activity, more comorbidities, worse cognition, more IADLs/ADLs and more falls in the past year (all p<0.05). Post-jump pain occurred in 4.6{\%} (58/1,268), with 2 participants stopping testing due to pain. Only 24/1,242 (2{\%}) had all trials/participant without flight (i.e., inability to lift feet), with 323/1,242 having ≥1 trial/participant without flight (total of 28{\%}). No serious adverse safety events (e.g., injury) occurred. Conclusions: A multicenter cohort of oldest men with a range of function had higher declines in jump power/kg and velocity vs. force/kg across each 5-year age group >80 years. Future research should examine age- and functional-related declines in jump measures related to physical performance decline, falls, fractures, and disability.",
author = "{Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Research Group} and Strotmeyer, {Elsa S.} and Winger, {M. E.} and Cauley, {J. A.} and Boudreau, {R. M.} and D. Cusick and Collins, {R. F.} and D. Chalhoub and B. Buehring and Eric Orwoll and Harris, {T. B.} and Carrie Nielson",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1007/s12603-018-1081-x",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--9",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Normative Values of Muscle Power Using Force Plate Jump Tests in Men Aged 77–101 Years

T2 - The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study

AU - Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Research Group

AU - Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

AU - Winger, M. E.

AU - Cauley, J. A.

AU - Boudreau, R. M.

AU - Cusick, D.

AU - Collins, R. F.

AU - Chalhoub, D.

AU - Buehring, B.

AU - Orwoll, Eric

AU - Harris, T. B.

AU - Nielson, Carrie

PY - 2018/7/7

Y1 - 2018/7/7

N2 - Objective: To determine normative values for weight-bearing, countermovement leg extension (“jump”) tests in the oldest men and characteristics of those not completing vs. completing tests Design: 2014-16 cross-sectional exam. Setting: Six U.S. sites from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study. Participants: Community-dwelling men (N=1,841) aged 84.5±4.2 (range: 77-101) years. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: Jump tests on a force plate measured lower-extremity muscle peak power/kg, velocity and force/kg at peak power, with normative values for 5-year age groups and by limitations in moderate-intensity activities of daily living (ADLs) and climbing several flights of stairs. Results: Jump completion was 68.9% (N=1,268/1,841) and 98% (1,242/1,268) had >1 analyzable trial/participant. Exclusions primarily were due to poor mobility and/or balance: 24.8% (456/1,841) prior to and 6.4% (N=117/1,841) after attempting testing. Peak power was 20.8±5.3 W/kg, with 1.2±0.3 m/s for velocity, and 16.7±1.9 N/kg for force at peak power. Each 5-year age group >80 years had subsequently 10% lower power/kg, with 30% lower power/kg at >90 vs. <80 years (all p<0.05). Velocity and force/kg at peak power were 24% and 9% lower respectively, at >90 vs. <80 years (all p<0.05). Limitations in both moderate ADLs and climbing several flights of stairs were associated with 16% lower age-adjusted power/kg, equivalent to 5–10 years of aging, with 11% and 6% lower age-adjusted velocity and force/ kg respectively, vs. those without limitation (all p<0.05). Men not completing vs. completing jumps had older age, higher BMI, lower physical activity, more comorbidities, worse cognition, more IADLs/ADLs and more falls in the past year (all p<0.05). Post-jump pain occurred in 4.6% (58/1,268), with 2 participants stopping testing due to pain. Only 24/1,242 (2%) had all trials/participant without flight (i.e., inability to lift feet), with 323/1,242 having ≥1 trial/participant without flight (total of 28%). No serious adverse safety events (e.g., injury) occurred. Conclusions: A multicenter cohort of oldest men with a range of function had higher declines in jump power/kg and velocity vs. force/kg across each 5-year age group >80 years. Future research should examine age- and functional-related declines in jump measures related to physical performance decline, falls, fractures, and disability.

AB - Objective: To determine normative values for weight-bearing, countermovement leg extension (“jump”) tests in the oldest men and characteristics of those not completing vs. completing tests Design: 2014-16 cross-sectional exam. Setting: Six U.S. sites from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study. Participants: Community-dwelling men (N=1,841) aged 84.5±4.2 (range: 77-101) years. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: Jump tests on a force plate measured lower-extremity muscle peak power/kg, velocity and force/kg at peak power, with normative values for 5-year age groups and by limitations in moderate-intensity activities of daily living (ADLs) and climbing several flights of stairs. Results: Jump completion was 68.9% (N=1,268/1,841) and 98% (1,242/1,268) had >1 analyzable trial/participant. Exclusions primarily were due to poor mobility and/or balance: 24.8% (456/1,841) prior to and 6.4% (N=117/1,841) after attempting testing. Peak power was 20.8±5.3 W/kg, with 1.2±0.3 m/s for velocity, and 16.7±1.9 N/kg for force at peak power. Each 5-year age group >80 years had subsequently 10% lower power/kg, with 30% lower power/kg at >90 vs. <80 years (all p<0.05). Velocity and force/kg at peak power were 24% and 9% lower respectively, at >90 vs. <80 years (all p<0.05). Limitations in both moderate ADLs and climbing several flights of stairs were associated with 16% lower age-adjusted power/kg, equivalent to 5–10 years of aging, with 11% and 6% lower age-adjusted velocity and force/ kg respectively, vs. those without limitation (all p<0.05). Men not completing vs. completing jumps had older age, higher BMI, lower physical activity, more comorbidities, worse cognition, more IADLs/ADLs and more falls in the past year (all p<0.05). Post-jump pain occurred in 4.6% (58/1,268), with 2 participants stopping testing due to pain. Only 24/1,242 (2%) had all trials/participant without flight (i.e., inability to lift feet), with 323/1,242 having ≥1 trial/participant without flight (total of 28%). No serious adverse safety events (e.g., injury) occurred. Conclusions: A multicenter cohort of oldest men with a range of function had higher declines in jump power/kg and velocity vs. force/kg across each 5-year age group >80 years. Future research should examine age- and functional-related declines in jump measures related to physical performance decline, falls, fractures, and disability.

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