Nonsurgical Treatment of Delayed-Onset Brachial Plexopathy Due to Hypertrophic Clavicular Callus

A Case Report

Benjamin M. Carpenter, David Pettersson, Adam Mirarchi, Drew Groshong, Hans Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Clavicular fractures are common injuries that traditionally are managed nonsurgically without clinically significant sequelae. However, they may develop hypertrophic callus formation that compresses the brachial plexus. These cases may present months to years after initial injury with varying degrees of pain, paresthesia, and weakness on the affected side and usually are treated by surgical resection of the hypertrophic callus. We present a case of brachial plexopathy due to hypertrophic clavicular callus causing weakness and paresthesia. The plexopathy was confirmed with imaging and electrodiagnostic studies. This case was unusual in that resolution of symptoms was achieved nonsurgically. Level of Evidence: To be determined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPM and R
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Brachial Plexus Neuropathies
Bony Callus
Paresthesia
Brachial Plexus
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Nonsurgical Treatment of Delayed-Onset Brachial Plexopathy Due to Hypertrophic Clavicular Callus: A Case Report",
abstract = "Clavicular fractures are common injuries that traditionally are managed nonsurgically without clinically significant sequelae. However, they may develop hypertrophic callus formation that compresses the brachial plexus. These cases may present months to years after initial injury with varying degrees of pain, paresthesia, and weakness on the affected side and usually are treated by surgical resection of the hypertrophic callus. We present a case of brachial plexopathy due to hypertrophic clavicular callus causing weakness and paresthesia. The plexopathy was confirmed with imaging and electrodiagnostic studies. This case was unusual in that resolution of symptoms was achieved nonsurgically. Level of Evidence: To be determined.",
author = "Carpenter, {Benjamin M.} and David Pettersson and Adam Mirarchi and Drew Groshong and Hans Carlson",
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AU - Pettersson, David

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AU - Groshong, Drew

AU - Carlson, Hans

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N2 - Clavicular fractures are common injuries that traditionally are managed nonsurgically without clinically significant sequelae. However, they may develop hypertrophic callus formation that compresses the brachial plexus. These cases may present months to years after initial injury with varying degrees of pain, paresthesia, and weakness on the affected side and usually are treated by surgical resection of the hypertrophic callus. We present a case of brachial plexopathy due to hypertrophic clavicular callus causing weakness and paresthesia. The plexopathy was confirmed with imaging and electrodiagnostic studies. This case was unusual in that resolution of symptoms was achieved nonsurgically. Level of Evidence: To be determined.

AB - Clavicular fractures are common injuries that traditionally are managed nonsurgically without clinically significant sequelae. However, they may develop hypertrophic callus formation that compresses the brachial plexus. These cases may present months to years after initial injury with varying degrees of pain, paresthesia, and weakness on the affected side and usually are treated by surgical resection of the hypertrophic callus. We present a case of brachial plexopathy due to hypertrophic clavicular callus causing weakness and paresthesia. The plexopathy was confirmed with imaging and electrodiagnostic studies. This case was unusual in that resolution of symptoms was achieved nonsurgically. Level of Evidence: To be determined.

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