Noninvasive murine glioma detection improved following photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence

Summer Gibbs, Scott C. Davis, Julia A. O'Hara, P. Jack Hoopes, Tayyaba Hasan, Brian W. Pogue

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA) is a prodrug which can be administered to cells, animals or patients after which it is transformed via the Heme synthesis pathway into the fluorescent molecule Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). PpIX has been shown to be useful as both a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and as a fluorescence imaging contrast agent. The ALA-PpIX system not only provides contrast for fluorescence imaging but also gives information about the metabolic activity of the imaged tissue and thus could be useful for monitoring cancer therapy. In the current study skin photobleaching was examined to determine if PpIX fluorescence contrast in malignant brain tumors could be better visualized noninvasively. Red light photobleaching decreased skin PpIX fluorescence and increased the ability to noninvasively quantify PpIX fluorescence in murine gliomas, as in vivo measurements of mean PpIX fluorescence more closely matched ex vivo quantification following skin photobleaching. Three doses of blue light photobleaching (4 J/cm2, 8 J/cm2 and 12 J/cm2) were tested and determined to give similar levels of skin photobleaching as well as a similar window of decreased skin PpIX fluorescence for noninvasive fluorescence imaging following the photobleaching dose administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationOptical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection
Subtitle of host publicationMechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVII
Volume6845
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
EventOptical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVII - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 19 2008Jan 20 2008

Other

OtherOptical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVII
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/19/081/20/08

Fingerprint

Photobleaching
Skin
Fluorescence
Imaging techniques
Photodynamic therapy
Photosensitizers
Acids
Dosimetry
Tumors
Brain
Animals
Tissue
Molecules
Monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Gibbs, S., Davis, S. C., O'Hara, J. A., Hoopes, P. J., Hasan, T., & Pogue, B. W. (2008). Noninvasive murine glioma detection improved following photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence. In Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVII (Vol. 6845). [68450D] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.762997

Noninvasive murine glioma detection improved following photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence. / Gibbs, Summer; Davis, Scott C.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVII. Vol. 6845 2008. 68450D.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gibbs, S, Davis, SC, O'Hara, JA, Hoopes, PJ, Hasan, T & Pogue, BW 2008, Noninvasive murine glioma detection improved following photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence. in Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVII. vol. 6845, 68450D, Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVII, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/19/08. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.762997
Gibbs S, Davis SC, O'Hara JA, Hoopes PJ, Hasan T, Pogue BW. Noninvasive murine glioma detection improved following photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence. In Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVII. Vol. 6845. 2008. 68450D https://doi.org/10.1117/12.762997
Gibbs, Summer ; Davis, Scott C. ; O'Hara, Julia A. ; Hoopes, P. Jack ; Hasan, Tayyaba ; Pogue, Brian W. / Noninvasive murine glioma detection improved following photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence. Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy XVII. Vol. 6845 2008.
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