Noninvasive FFR Derived From Coronary CT Angiography: Management and Outcomes in the PROMISE Trial

Michael T. Lu, Maros Ferencik, Rhonda S. Roberts, Kerry L. Lee, Alexander Ivanov, Elizabeth Adami, Daniel B. Mark, Farouc A. Jaffer, Jonathon A. Leipsic, Pamela S. Douglas, Udo Hoffmann

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    104 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine whether noninvasive fractional flow reserve derived from computed tomography (FFRCT) predicts coronary revascularization and outcomes and whether its addition improves efficiency of referral to invasive coronary angiography (ICA) after coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). Background FFRCT may improve the efficiency of an anatomic CTA strategy for stable chest pain. Methods This observational cohort study included patients with stable chest pain in the PROMISE (PROspective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of Chest Pain) trial referred to ICA within 90 days after CTA. FFRCT was measured at a blinded core laboratory, and FFRCT results were unavailable to caregivers. We determined the agreement of FFRCT (positive if ≤0.80) with stenosis on CTA and ICA (positive if ≥50% left main or ≥70% other coronary artery), and predictive value for a composite of coronary revascularization or major adverse cardiac events (death, myocardial infarction, or unstable angina). We retrospectively assessed whether adding FFRCT ≤0.80 as a gatekeeper could improve efficiency of referral to ICA, defined as decreased rate of ICA without ≥50% stenosis and increased ICA leading to revascularization. Results FFRCT was calculated in 67% (181 of 271) of eligible patients (mean age 62 years; 36% women). FFRCT was discordant with stenosis in 31% (57 of 181) for CTA and 29% (52 of 181) for ICA. Most patients undergoing coronary revascularization had an FFRCT of ≤0.80 (91%; 80 of 88). An FFRCT of ≤0.80 was a significantly better predictor for revascularization or major adverse cardiac events than severe CTA stenosis (HR: 4.3 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.4 to 8.9] vs. 2.9 [95% CI: 1.8 to 5.1]; p = 0.033). Reserving ICA for patients with an FFRCT of ≤0.80 could decrease ICA without ≥50% stenosis by 44%, and increase the proportion of ICA leading to revascularization by 24%. Conclusions In this hypothesis-generating study of patients with stable chest pain referred to ICA from CTA, an FFRCT of ≤0.80 was a better predictor of revascularization or major adverse cardiac events than severe stenosis on CTA. Adding FFRCT may improve efficiency of referral to ICA from CTA alone.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1350-1358
    Number of pages9
    JournalJACC: Cardiovascular Imaging
    Volume10
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 2017

    Keywords

    • computational fluid dynamics
    • coronary angiography
    • coronary artery disease
    • coronary computed tomography angiography
    • fractional flow reserve

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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