Nocturnal enuresis: An approach to assessment and treatment

Aaron P. Bayne, Steven J. Skoog

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

On the basis of strong evidence, although primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE) is common and most children will outgrow the condition spontaneously, the psychological effect to the child can be significant and represents the main reason for treatment of these children. • On the basis of international consensus panels, treatment of PMNE should be targeted toward the specific type of bedwetting patterns the child has, using bladder diary, sleep history, and daytime elimination concerns as a guide (Table 3). • On the basis of international consensus panels, it is important for the primary care physician to be able to differentiate children with PMNE from children with nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (NMNE) and secondary nocturnal enuresis. • On the basis of international consensus panels, children with NMNE should have their underlying voiding or stool problem addressed before initiation of therapy for the nocturnal enuresis. • On the basis of strong evidence, both the bedwetting alarm and desmopressin are considered first-line therapy for children with PMNE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-335
Number of pages9
JournalPediatrics in Review
Volume35
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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