No safe harbor: The principle of complicity and the practice of voluntary stopping of eating and drinking

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

In recent years, a number of writers have proposed voluntary stopping of eating and drinking as an alternative to physician-assisted suicide. This paper calls attention to and discusses some of the ethical complications that surround the practice of voluntary stopping of eating and drinking. The paper argues that voluntary stopping of eating and drinking raises very difficult ethical questions. These questions center on the moral responsibility of clinicians who care for the terminally ill as well as the nature and limits of the authority they exercise over them.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-74
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Medicine and Philosophy
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2004

Keywords

  • Authority
  • Complicity
  • Cooperation
  • Fasting
  • Food and fluids
  • Physician-assisted suicide
  • Terminal suffering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Philosophy

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