NICH at Its Best for Diabetes at Its Worst

Texting Teens and Their Caregivers for Better Outcomes

David V. Wagner, Samantha A. Barry, Maggie Stoeckel, Lena Teplitsky, Michael Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is growing evidence for the feasibility of text-based interventions for pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, less is known regarding whether the use of personalized text messages with high-risk youth and their caregivers is associated with improvements in youth health. This study examines the use of diabetes-specific texts and associated health outcomes for participants of the Novel Interventions in Children's Healthcare (NICH) program. Methods: Text messages sent to youth with T1D and their caregivers during NICH intervention were coded regarding diabetes relevance and adherence-related content. Health outcome data (eg, HbA1c values, hospital admissions) prior to and following NICH program enrollment were collected. Results: Fewer than half (43%) of texts sent to patients and their caregivers were identified as being related to diabetes, and over 95% of diabetes-related texts were identified as adherence-related. Participants in the NICH program demonstrated a significant decrease in HbA1c values, t(23) = 2.78, p ≤.05, and DKA-related hospital visits, t(24) = 2.78, p ≤.01, during program involvement. Although no relationships were identified between patient-recipient text characteristics and health outcomes, the frequency and type of text messaging with caregivers was significantly associated with changes in health outcomes. Conclusions: This study represents the most extensive evaluation of diabetes-related SMS use and health outcomes for NICH participants to date. Findings demonstrate improvements in patient health during NICH program involvement. Implications include that sending frequent, personalized, and adherence-reinforcing texts to patients' caregivers may result in improved patient health, decreased utilization, and, potentially, associated reductions in health care costs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)468-475
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of diabetes science and technology
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

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Text Messaging
Medical problems
Caregivers
Health
Delivery of Health Care
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Text messaging
Pediatrics
Health care
Health Care Costs

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • mHealth
  • NICH
  • SMS
  • text message
  • type 1 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine(all)
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

NICH at Its Best for Diabetes at Its Worst : Texting Teens and Their Caregivers for Better Outcomes. / Wagner, David V.; Barry, Samantha A.; Stoeckel, Maggie; Teplitsky, Lena; Harris, Michael.

In: Journal of diabetes science and technology, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.05.2017, p. 468-475.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wagner, David V. ; Barry, Samantha A. ; Stoeckel, Maggie ; Teplitsky, Lena ; Harris, Michael. / NICH at Its Best for Diabetes at Its Worst : Texting Teens and Their Caregivers for Better Outcomes. In: Journal of diabetes science and technology. 2017 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 468-475.
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