New Zealand women living with HIV/AIDS

a feminist perspective.

Jill Bennett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper draws on current and earlier literature, together with observational and anecdotal data to reveal the situation of HIV positive women in New Zealand. The present picture is examined in relation to data from a previously unpublished qualitative study undertaken by the author in 2001 using a feminist perspective. It would seem that dominant concerns of the women today are much the same as those surfacing in the earlier study. These include stigma and the associated problem of whether to conceal or reveal. Additionally these women are concerned that health professionals do not always take their problems seriously. Their distress is aggravated by fact of them being women suffering from what is generally seen as a male disease. The feminist perspective highlights the relative powerlessness of many women in the context of sexual relations whereby much of the prophylactic advice--such as insistence on condom use--becomes irrelevant. New women oriented education programmes are needed. It is argued that nurses are well placed to make a positive contribution in this area of care, and in fact are obligated to do so if their practice is to be consistent with the profession's declared aims with respect to cultural safety. However it is noted that there is still a degree of prejudice and ignorance to be overcome before the desired results will be achieved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-16
Number of pages13
JournalNursing praxis in New Zealand inc
Volume23
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 2007
Externally publishedYes

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New Zealand
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV
Condoms
Women's Health
Nurses
Safety
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

New Zealand women living with HIV/AIDS : a feminist perspective. / Bennett, Jill.

In: Nursing praxis in New Zealand inc, Vol. 23, No. 1, 07.2007, p. 4-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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