New prescriptions

How well do patients remember important information?

Derjung M. Tarn, Sue Flocke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patients receiving more information about a new prescription are more adherent to their medication regimens and have better treatment outcomes. Yet it is unclear how much information patients retain when they receive a new prescription. This study aims to describe patient recall of information about new medication prescriptions after an outpatient visit. METHODS: We used a cross-sectional study of 117 adult outpatient visits to six family physicians. Direct observation of physician-patient encounters by medical students was used to document discussion of information about new prescriptions. Patient recall of specific prescription information was assessed by interviewing patients immediately after the visit. RESULTS: When prescribing a new medication, physicians most frequently discussed the medication purpose (all visits), how often to take the medication (82%), and how much to take (76%). On average, patients recalled 86% (± 23%) of the information provided, and 64% recalled all information discussed during their visit. Of the 42 patients who failed to recall all of the information, 47% forgot how much to take and 42% forgot potential side effects, but only 24% forgot directions about when to take their medication. Complete recall of information about a new prescription was not associated with the amount of information provided, patient education, race, or duration of relationship with their physician. CONCLUSIONS: Almost two thirds of patients remember all of the basic information they are given when a new medication is prescribed. Providers should work on improving patient education when prescribing new medications and should not be deterred by worries about poor patient recall.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-259
Number of pages6
JournalFamily medicine
Volume43
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prescriptions
Patient Education
Physicians
Outpatients
Family Physicians
Medical Students
Cross-Sectional Studies
Observation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

New prescriptions : How well do patients remember important information? / Tarn, Derjung M.; Flocke, Sue.

In: Family medicine, Vol. 43, No. 4, 01.04.2011, p. 254-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{61a14d86abaf486fac92b082152977d8,
title = "New prescriptions: How well do patients remember important information?",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patients receiving more information about a new prescription are more adherent to their medication regimens and have better treatment outcomes. Yet it is unclear how much information patients retain when they receive a new prescription. This study aims to describe patient recall of information about new medication prescriptions after an outpatient visit. METHODS: We used a cross-sectional study of 117 adult outpatient visits to six family physicians. Direct observation of physician-patient encounters by medical students was used to document discussion of information about new prescriptions. Patient recall of specific prescription information was assessed by interviewing patients immediately after the visit. RESULTS: When prescribing a new medication, physicians most frequently discussed the medication purpose (all visits), how often to take the medication (82{\%}), and how much to take (76{\%}). On average, patients recalled 86{\%} (± 23{\%}) of the information provided, and 64{\%} recalled all information discussed during their visit. Of the 42 patients who failed to recall all of the information, 47{\%} forgot how much to take and 42{\%} forgot potential side effects, but only 24{\%} forgot directions about when to take their medication. Complete recall of information about a new prescription was not associated with the amount of information provided, patient education, race, or duration of relationship with their physician. CONCLUSIONS: Almost two thirds of patients remember all of the basic information they are given when a new medication is prescribed. Providers should work on improving patient education when prescribing new medications and should not be deterred by worries about poor patient recall.",
author = "Tarn, {Derjung M.} and Sue Flocke",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "254--259",
journal = "Family Medicine",
issn = "0742-3225",
publisher = "Society of Teachers of Family Medicine",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - New prescriptions

T2 - How well do patients remember important information?

AU - Tarn, Derjung M.

AU - Flocke, Sue

PY - 2011/4/1

Y1 - 2011/4/1

N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patients receiving more information about a new prescription are more adherent to their medication regimens and have better treatment outcomes. Yet it is unclear how much information patients retain when they receive a new prescription. This study aims to describe patient recall of information about new medication prescriptions after an outpatient visit. METHODS: We used a cross-sectional study of 117 adult outpatient visits to six family physicians. Direct observation of physician-patient encounters by medical students was used to document discussion of information about new prescriptions. Patient recall of specific prescription information was assessed by interviewing patients immediately after the visit. RESULTS: When prescribing a new medication, physicians most frequently discussed the medication purpose (all visits), how often to take the medication (82%), and how much to take (76%). On average, patients recalled 86% (± 23%) of the information provided, and 64% recalled all information discussed during their visit. Of the 42 patients who failed to recall all of the information, 47% forgot how much to take and 42% forgot potential side effects, but only 24% forgot directions about when to take their medication. Complete recall of information about a new prescription was not associated with the amount of information provided, patient education, race, or duration of relationship with their physician. CONCLUSIONS: Almost two thirds of patients remember all of the basic information they are given when a new medication is prescribed. Providers should work on improving patient education when prescribing new medications and should not be deterred by worries about poor patient recall.

AB - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patients receiving more information about a new prescription are more adherent to their medication regimens and have better treatment outcomes. Yet it is unclear how much information patients retain when they receive a new prescription. This study aims to describe patient recall of information about new medication prescriptions after an outpatient visit. METHODS: We used a cross-sectional study of 117 adult outpatient visits to six family physicians. Direct observation of physician-patient encounters by medical students was used to document discussion of information about new prescriptions. Patient recall of specific prescription information was assessed by interviewing patients immediately after the visit. RESULTS: When prescribing a new medication, physicians most frequently discussed the medication purpose (all visits), how often to take the medication (82%), and how much to take (76%). On average, patients recalled 86% (± 23%) of the information provided, and 64% recalled all information discussed during their visit. Of the 42 patients who failed to recall all of the information, 47% forgot how much to take and 42% forgot potential side effects, but only 24% forgot directions about when to take their medication. Complete recall of information about a new prescription was not associated with the amount of information provided, patient education, race, or duration of relationship with their physician. CONCLUSIONS: Almost two thirds of patients remember all of the basic information they are given when a new medication is prescribed. Providers should work on improving patient education when prescribing new medications and should not be deterred by worries about poor patient recall.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79955087642&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79955087642&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 43

SP - 254

EP - 259

JO - Family Medicine

JF - Family Medicine

SN - 0742-3225

IS - 4

ER -