New insights into the genetics of preeclampsia

Terry Morgan, K. Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Preeclampsia is familial. Pedigree analyses suggest that one or more common alleles may act as 'preeclampsia susceptibility genes.' The authors speculate that genes involved in blood pressure control, volume regulation, placental health, vascular disease, and vascular remodeling, underlie familial susceptibility to preeclampsia. Several candidate genes have been examined. These data suggest that a common mutation in the angiotensinogen promoter, A(-6), leads to elevated expression of this gene and pleiotropic effects, including abnormal spiral artery remodeling and failed hypervolemia of pregnancy. The factor V Leiden mutation, which predisposes women to thromboembolic disorders during pregnancy, has been implicated as another preeclampsia susceptibility gene. New insights into the genetics of preeclampsia will contribute to the understanding of this disease and should ultimately lead to improved diagnosis and treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-23
Number of pages10
JournalSeminars in Perinatology
Volume23
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pre-Eclampsia
Genes
Genetic Pleiotropy
Pregnancy
Angiotensinogen
Mutation
Pedigree
Vascular Diseases
Arteries
Alleles
Blood Pressure
Gene Expression
Health
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

New insights into the genetics of preeclampsia. / Morgan, Terry; Ward, K.

In: Seminars in Perinatology, Vol. 23, No. 1, 1999, p. 14-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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