Neutralizing antibody directed against the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein can completely block HIV-1/SIV chimetic virus infections of macaque monkeys

Riri Shibata, Tatsuhiko Igarashi, Nancy Haigwood, Alicia Buckler-White, Robert Ogert, William Ross, Ronald Willey, Michael W. Cho, Malcolm A. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

483 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Virus-specific antibodies protect individuals against a wide variety of viral infections. To assess whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV- 1) envelope-specific antibodies confer resistance against primate lentivirus infections, we purified immunoglobulin (IgG) from chimpanzees infected with several different HIV-1 isolates, and used this for passive immunization of pig-tailed macaques. These monkeys were subsequently challenged intravenously with a chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) bearing an envelope glycoprotein derived form HIV-1(DH12), a dual-tropic primary virus isolate. Here we show that anti-SHIV neutralizing activity, determined in vitro using an assay measuring loss of infectivity, is the absolute requirement for antibody-mediated protection in vivo. Using an assay that measures 100% neutralization, the titer in plasma for complete protection of the SHIV-challenged macaques was in the range of 1:5-1:8. The HIV-1-specific neutralizing antibodies studied are able to bind to native gp120 present on infectious virus particles. Administration of non-neutralizing anti-HIV IgG neither inhibited nor enhanced a subsequent SHIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-210
Number of pages7
JournalNature Medicine
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Macaca
Virus Diseases
Neutralizing Antibodies
Simian Immunodeficiency Virus
Viruses
Haplorhini
HIV-1
Glycoproteins
HIV
Antibodies
Lentivirus Infections
Primate Lentiviruses
Passive Immunization
Pan troglodytes
Assays
Bearings (structural)
Immunoglobulin G
Virion
Immunoglobulins
Immunization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Neutralizing antibody directed against the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein can completely block HIV-1/SIV chimetic virus infections of macaque monkeys. / Shibata, Riri; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Haigwood, Nancy; Buckler-White, Alicia; Ogert, Robert; Ross, William; Willey, Ronald; Cho, Michael W.; Martin, Malcolm A.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 2, 02.1999, p. 204-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shibata, Riri ; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko ; Haigwood, Nancy ; Buckler-White, Alicia ; Ogert, Robert ; Ross, William ; Willey, Ronald ; Cho, Michael W. ; Martin, Malcolm A. / Neutralizing antibody directed against the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein can completely block HIV-1/SIV chimetic virus infections of macaque monkeys. In: Nature Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 204-210.
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