Neuroscience of alcohol for addiction medicine: Neurobiological targets for prevention and intervention in adolescents

Anita Cservenka, Bonnie Nagel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Structural and functional neuroimaging studies indicate that heavy alcohol use during adolescence may be neurotoxic to the brain. This chapter reviews the neuroimaging findings in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of adolescent heavy alcohol users. These youth exhibit reductions in prefrontal, hippocampal, and cerebellar brain volume, decreased frontoparietal, and increased frontolimbic white matter integrity, as well as alterations in blood oxygen level-dependent response during working memory, inhibitory control, verbal encoding, decision making, and reward processing—some of which appear to differ between males and females. Although some exist, additional longitudinal studies will significantly advance addiction medicine by aiding prevention scientists and treatment providers to develop neurobiologically informed ways of strengthening neural networks prior to and after the onset of heavy alcohol use, thereby promoting healthy cognitive functioning across the adolescent period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Brain Research
PublisherElsevier B.V.
Pages215-235
Number of pages21
Volume223
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Publication series

NameProgress in Brain Research
Volume223
ISSN (Print)00796123
ISSN (Electronic)18757855

Fingerprint

Neurosciences
Alcoholism
Medicine
Alcohols
Longitudinal Studies
Functional Neuroimaging
Brain
Reward
Short-Term Memory
Neuroimaging
Decision Making
Cross-Sectional Studies
Oxygen
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Alcohol
  • Brain volume
  • fMRI
  • White matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Cservenka, A., & Nagel, B. (2016). Neuroscience of alcohol for addiction medicine: Neurobiological targets for prevention and intervention in adolescents. In Progress in Brain Research (Vol. 223, pp. 215-235). (Progress in Brain Research; Vol. 223). Elsevier B.V.. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.pbr.2015.07.027

Neuroscience of alcohol for addiction medicine : Neurobiological targets for prevention and intervention in adolescents. / Cservenka, Anita; Nagel, Bonnie.

Progress in Brain Research. Vol. 223 Elsevier B.V., 2016. p. 215-235 (Progress in Brain Research; Vol. 223).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cservenka, A & Nagel, B 2016, Neuroscience of alcohol for addiction medicine: Neurobiological targets for prevention and intervention in adolescents. in Progress in Brain Research. vol. 223, Progress in Brain Research, vol. 223, Elsevier B.V., pp. 215-235. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.pbr.2015.07.027
Cservenka A, Nagel B. Neuroscience of alcohol for addiction medicine: Neurobiological targets for prevention and intervention in adolescents. In Progress in Brain Research. Vol. 223. Elsevier B.V. 2016. p. 215-235. (Progress in Brain Research). https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.pbr.2015.07.027
Cservenka, Anita ; Nagel, Bonnie. / Neuroscience of alcohol for addiction medicine : Neurobiological targets for prevention and intervention in adolescents. Progress in Brain Research. Vol. 223 Elsevier B.V., 2016. pp. 215-235 (Progress in Brain Research).
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