Neuropsychological, balance, and mobility risk factors for falls in people with multiple sclerosis

A prospective cohort study

Phu D. Hoang, Michelle Cameron, Simon C. Gandevia, Stephen R. Lord

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To determine whether impaired performance in a range of vision, proprioception, neuropsychological, balance, and mobility tests and pain and fatigue are associated with falls in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Design Prospective cohort study with 6-month follow-up. Setting A multiple sclerosis (MS) physiotherapy clinic. Participants Community-dwelling people (N=210; age range, 21-74y) with MS (Disease Steps 0-5). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Incidence of falls during 6 months' follow-up. Results In the 6-month follow-up period, 83 participants (39.7%) experienced no falls, 57 (27.3%) fell once or twice, and 69 (33.0%) fell 3 or more times. Frequent falling (≥3) was associated with increased postural sway (eyes open and closed), poor leaning balance (as assessed with the coordinated stability task), slow choice stepping reaction time, reduced walking speed, reduced executive functioning (as assessed with the difference between Trail Making Test Part B and Trail Making Test Part A), reduced fine motor control (performance on the 9-Hole Peg Test [9-HPT]), and reported leg pain. Increased sway with the eyes closed, poor coordinated stability, and reduced performance in the 9-HPT were identified as variables that significantly and independently discriminated between frequent fallers and nonfrequent fallers (model χ2 3=30.1, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)480-486
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume95
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Trail Making Test
Multiple Sclerosis
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Independent Living
Pain
Proprioception
Reaction Time
Fatigue
Leg
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Incidence
Walking Speed

Keywords

  • Accidental falls
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Neuropsychological tests
  • Postural balance
  • Rehabilitation
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Neuropsychological, balance, and mobility risk factors for falls in people with multiple sclerosis : A prospective cohort study. / Hoang, Phu D.; Cameron, Michelle; Gandevia, Simon C.; Lord, Stephen R.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 95, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 480-486.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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