Neuronal migration during development and the amyloid precursor protein

Philip Copenhaver, Jenna M. Ramaker

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) is the source of amyloid peptides that accumulate in Alzheimer's disease. However, members of the APP family are strongly expressed in the developing nervous systems of invertebrates and vertebrates, where they regulate neuronal guidance, synaptic remodeling, and injury responses. In contrast to mammals, insects express only one APP ortholog (APPL), simplifying investigations into its normal functions. Recent studies have shown that APPL regulates neuronal migration in the developing insect nervous system, analogous to the roles ascribed to APP family proteins in the mammalian cortex. The comparative simplicity of insect systems offers new opportunities for deciphering the signaling mechanisms by which this enigmatic class of proteins contributes to the formation and function of the nervous system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Opinion in Insect Science
Volume18
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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amyloid
protein
nervous system
proteins
insect
insects
Alzheimer disease
peptide
cortex
vertebrate
mammal
invertebrate
invertebrates
vertebrates
peptides
mammals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Insect Science

Cite this

Neuronal migration during development and the amyloid precursor protein. / Copenhaver, Philip; Ramaker, Jenna M.

In: Current Opinion in Insect Science, Vol. 18, 01.12.2016, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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