Neural processing of reward in adolescent rodents

Nicholas W. Simon, Bita Moghaddam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Immaturities in adolescent reward processing are thought to contribute to poor decision making and increased susceptibility to develop addictive and psychiatric disorders. Very little is known; however, about how the adolescent brain processes reward. The current mechanistic theories of reward processing are derived from adult models. Here we review recent research focused on understanding of how the adolescent brain responds to rewards and reward-associated events. A critical aspect of this work is that age-related differences are evident in neuronal processing of reward-related events across multiple brain regions even when adolescent rats demonstrate behavior similar to adults. These include differences in reward processing between adolescent and adult rats in orbitofrontal cortex and dorsal striatum. Surprisingly, minimal age related differences are observed in ventral striatum, which has been a focal point of developmental studies. We go on to discuss the implications of these differences for behavioral traits affected in adolescence, such as impulsivity, risk-taking, and behavioral flexibility. Collectively, this work suggests that reward-evoked neural activity differs as a function of age and that regions such as the dorsal striatum that are not traditionally associated with affective processing in adults may be critical for reward processing and psychiatric vulnerability in adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-154
Number of pages10
JournalDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Reward
Rodentia
Psychiatry
Brain
Impulsive Behavior
Risk-Taking
Prefrontal Cortex
Decision Making
Research

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Dopamine
  • Electrophysiology
  • Rat
  • Reward
  • Striatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Neural processing of reward in adolescent rodents. / Simon, Nicholas W.; Moghaddam, Bita.

In: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 11, 2015, p. 145-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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