Neonatal outcomes in the setting of preterm premature rupture of membranes complicated by chorioamnionitis

Natali Aziz, Yvonne W. Cheng, Aaron B. Caughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective.To examine the outcomes of neonates born to women with chorioamnionitis in the setting of preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). Methods.A retrospective cohort study was conducted of deliveries with diagnosis of PPROM between 24 and 34 weeks of gestation at an academic medical center. Patients who delivered with the diagnosis of clinical chorioamnionitis were compared with patients who delivered without this diagnosis. Neonatal outcomes including Apgar scores, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), sepsis, pneumonia, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) were assessed. Dichotomous outcomes were compared using chi-square test. Multivariable regression analyses were performed to control for potential confounding variables. Results.Of the 1153 patients diagnosed with PPROM, 29.0 were diagnosed with chorioamnionitis prior to delivery. Neonates born to mothers with a diagnosis of chorioamnionitis in the setting of PPROM had higher incidences (34.8) of low 5-min Apgar scores, RDS, NEC, ICH, and pneumonia compared with 22.9 in neonates born to mothers without chorioamnionitis (p<0.001). Conclusions.Patients who develop chorioamnionitis in the setting of PPROM are at higher risk for adverse neonatal outcomes compared with patients without chorioamnionitis in the setting of PPROM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)780-784
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

Keywords

  • Chorioamnionitis
  • Neonatal outcomes
  • PPROM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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