Neonatal intensive care unit discharge preparedness: Primary care implications

Vincent C. Smith, Dmitry Dukhovny, John A F Zupancic, Heidi B. Gates, Dewayne M. Pursley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To investigate specific post-neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) discharge outcomes and issues for families. Study design. The authors prospectively surveyed family's discharge preparedness at the infant's NICU discharge. In the weeks after the infant was discharged, families were interviewed by telephone for self-reported utilization of health services as well as any infant-associated problems or issues. Results. At discharge, 35 of 287 (12%) families were "unprepared" as defined by a Likert response of less than 7 by either the family member or nursing assessment. Unprepared families were more likely to report that their pediatrician could not access the infant's NICU hospital discharge summary, problems with the infant's milk/formula, and an inability to obtain needed feeding supplies. Conclusions. Although most of the families are "prepared" for discharge at the time of discharge, this study highlights several issues that primary care providers accepting care and NICU staff discharging infants/families should be aware.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)454-461
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Primary Health Care
Family Nursing
Nursing Assessment
Infant Formula
Telephone
Health Services
Milk

Keywords

  • infant
  • intensive care units
  • neonatal
  • newborn readiness
  • patient discharge
  • premature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Neonatal intensive care unit discharge preparedness : Primary care implications. / Smith, Vincent C.; Dukhovny, Dmitry; Zupancic, John A F; Gates, Heidi B.; Pursley, Dewayne M.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 51, No. 5, 05.2012, p. 454-461.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, Vincent C. ; Dukhovny, Dmitry ; Zupancic, John A F ; Gates, Heidi B. ; Pursley, Dewayne M. / Neonatal intensive care unit discharge preparedness : Primary care implications. In: Clinical Pediatrics. 2012 ; Vol. 51, No. 5. pp. 454-461.
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