Nelson's Syndrome and Spontaneous Pituitary Tumor Infarction

Richard M. Jordan, David M. Cook, John Kendall, Charles W. Kerber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Large, adrenocorticotrophic hormone-secreting pituitary tumors (Nelson's syndrome) developed in four of 12 patients treated with a bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing's disease. Two of the patients with Nelson's syndrome suffered spontaneous pituitary tumor infarctions. One patient improved under close observation and subsequent radiation therapy, although she ultimately died from her locally invasive tumor. The condition of the other patient—which had stabilized—appeared to be worsened by surgical intervention. The high incidence of these tumors after bilateral adrenalectomy, their large and aggressive nature, and their apparent propensity to undergo spontaneous infarction supports the position that initial therapy for Cushing's disease should be directed to the pituitary gland.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)340-342
Number of pages3
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume139
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1979
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nelson Syndrome
Pituitary Neoplasms
Infarction
Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion
Adrenalectomy
Pituitary Gland
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
Neoplasms
Radiotherapy
Observation
Incidence
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Nelson's Syndrome and Spontaneous Pituitary Tumor Infarction. / Jordan, Richard M.; Cook, David M.; Kendall, John; Kerber, Charles W.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 139, No. 3, 1979, p. 340-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jordan, Richard M. ; Cook, David M. ; Kendall, John ; Kerber, Charles W. / Nelson's Syndrome and Spontaneous Pituitary Tumor Infarction. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1979 ; Vol. 139, No. 3. pp. 340-342.
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