Neisseria infection of rhesus macaques as a model to study colonization, transmission, persistence, and horizontal gene transfer

Nathan J. Weyand, Anne M. Wertheimer, Theodore Hobbs, Jennifer L. Sisko, Nyiawung A. Taku, Lindsay D. Gregston, Susan Clary, Dustin L. Higashi, Nicolas Biais, Lewis M. Brown, Shannon L. Planer, Alfred W. Legasse, Michael Axthelm, Scott Wong, Magdalene So

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The strict tropism of many pathogens for man hampers the development of animal models that recapitulate important microbe-host interactions. We developed a rhesus macaque model for studying Neisseria-host interactions using Neisseria species indigenous to the animal. We report that Neisseria are common inhabitants of the rhesus macaque. Neisseria isolated from the rhesus macaque recolonize animals after laboratory passage, persist in the animals for at least 72 d, and are transmitted between animals. Neisseria are naturally competent and acquire genetic markers from each other in vivo, in the absence of selection, within 44 d after colonization. Neisseria macacae encodes orthologs of known or presumed virulence factors of human-adapted Neisseria, as well as current or candidate vaccine antigens. We conclude that the rhesus macaque model will allow studies of the molecular mechanisms of Neisseria colonization, transmission, persistence, and horizontal gene transfer. The model can potentially be developed further for preclinical testing of vaccine candidates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3059-3064
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume110
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 19 2013

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Neisseria
Horizontal Gene Transfer
Macaca mulatta
Infection
Vaccines
Tropism
Laboratory Animals
Virulence Factors
Genetic Markers
Animal Models
Antigens

Keywords

  • Commensal Neisseria
  • Nonhuman primate model
  • Type IV pili

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Neisseria infection of rhesus macaques as a model to study colonization, transmission, persistence, and horizontal gene transfer. / Weyand, Nathan J.; Wertheimer, Anne M.; Hobbs, Theodore; Sisko, Jennifer L.; Taku, Nyiawung A.; Gregston, Lindsay D.; Clary, Susan; Higashi, Dustin L.; Biais, Nicolas; Brown, Lewis M.; Planer, Shannon L.; Legasse, Alfred W.; Axthelm, Michael; Wong, Scott; So, Magdalene.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 110, No. 8, 19.02.2013, p. 3059-3064.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weyand, Nathan J. ; Wertheimer, Anne M. ; Hobbs, Theodore ; Sisko, Jennifer L. ; Taku, Nyiawung A. ; Gregston, Lindsay D. ; Clary, Susan ; Higashi, Dustin L. ; Biais, Nicolas ; Brown, Lewis M. ; Planer, Shannon L. ; Legasse, Alfred W. ; Axthelm, Michael ; Wong, Scott ; So, Magdalene. / Neisseria infection of rhesus macaques as a model to study colonization, transmission, persistence, and horizontal gene transfer. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2013 ; Vol. 110, No. 8. pp. 3059-3064.
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