Natural history of asymptomatic coronary arteriographic lesions in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease

William M. Bennett, Frank Kloster, Josef Rosch, John Barry, George A. Porter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Arteriosclerotic heart disease is a major cause of death in insulinrequiring juvenile diabetic patients treated for end-stage renal disease. Eleven consecutive diabetic patients without clinical evidence of coronary artery disease underwent complete cardiac evaluations, including coronary arteriography, as part of transplant recipient work-ups. Seven were women and four were men; their mean age was 32 (21 to 50 years). Angiographically, every patient had multifocal atherosclerotic coronary disease. Four of seven patients tested had positive-stress electrocardiograms. In this group of patients followed for a mean of 19.8 months, eight died. Of these deaths, six were due to coronary heart disease and another due to a stroke. In two patients who became clinically symptomatic, serial angiograms revealed progressive disease of the coronary circulation; (n one case, despite normal renal allograft function and serum lipid levels. The mode of end-stage renal disease treatment, serum lipids or blood pressure control could not be linked to mortality. It is concluded that arteriosclerotic heart disease is common in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease even when angina is absent. The natural history in this high risk population is an important consideration in the selection of patients for end-stage renal disease treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)779-784
Number of pages6
JournalThe American journal of medicine
Volume65
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1978
Externally publishedYes

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Natural History
Chronic Kidney Failure
Coronary Disease
Heart Diseases
Angiography
Lipids
Coronary Circulation
Serum
Patient Selection
Allografts
Coronary Artery Disease
Cause of Death
Electrocardiography
Stroke
Blood Pressure
Kidney
Mortality
Therapeutics
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Natural history of asymptomatic coronary arteriographic lesions in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease. / Bennett, William M.; Kloster, Frank; Rosch, Josef; Barry, John; Porter, George A.

In: The American journal of medicine, Vol. 65, No. 5, 1978, p. 779-784.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bennett, William M. ; Kloster, Frank ; Rosch, Josef ; Barry, John ; Porter, George A. / Natural history of asymptomatic coronary arteriographic lesions in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease. In: The American journal of medicine. 1978 ; Vol. 65, No. 5. pp. 779-784.
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