Nasal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization is associated with increased wound occurrence after major lower extremity amputation

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Abstract

Objective Wound occurrence (WO) after major lower extremity amputation (MLEA) can be due to wound infection or sterile dehiscence. We sought to determine the association of nasal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization and other patient factors with overall WO, WO due to wound infection, and WO due to sterile dehiscence. Methods The medical records of all patients undergoing MLEA from August 1, 2011, to November 1, 2013, were reviewed. Demographic data, hemoglobin A1c level, albumin concentration, dialysis dependence, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), nasal MRSA colonization, and diabetes mellitus (DM) were examined as variables. The overall WO rate was determined, and the cause of WO was categorized as either a sterile dehiscence or a wound infection. Results Eighty-three patients underwent 96 MLEAs during a 27-month period. The rates of overall WO, WO due to infection, and WO due to sterile dehiscence were 39%, 19%, and 19%, respectively (1% developed a traumatic wound). On univariate analysis, PVD, MRSA colonization, DM, and dialysis dependence were all associated with higher rates of overall WO (P <.05). On multivariate analysis, MRSA colonization was associated with higher rates of overall WO (P =.03) and WO due to wound infection (11% vs 45%; P <.01). DM and PVD were associated with higher rates of overall WO and WO due to sterile dehiscence on both univariate and multivariate analysis (P <.05). Conclusions Nasal MRSA colonization is associated with higher rates of overall WO and WO due to wound infection. DM and PVD are associated with higher rates of overall WO and WO due to sterile dehiscence but are not associated with WO due to wound infection. Further studies addressing the effect of nasal MRSA eradication on postoperative wound outcomes after MLEA are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-405
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of vascular surgery
Volume62
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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