Nanotechnology research: Applications in nutritional sciences

Pothur R. Srinivas, Martin Philbert, Tothu (Tania) Vu, Qingrong Huang, Josef L. Kokini, Etta Saos, Hongda Chen, Charles M. Peterson, Karl E. Friedl, Crystal McDade-Ngutter, Van Hubbard, Pamela Starke-Reed, Nancy Miller, Joseph M. Betz, Johanna Dwyer, John Milner, Sharon A. Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The tantalizing potential of nanotechnology is to fabricate and combine nanoscale approaches and building blocks to make useful tools and, ultimately, interventions for medical science, including nutritional science, at the scale of ∼1-100 nm. In the past few years, tools and techniques that facilitate studies and interventions in the nanoscale range have become widely available and have drawn widespread attention. Recently, investigators in the food and nutrition sciences have been applying the tools of nanotechnology in their research. The Experimental Biology 2009 symposium entitled "Nanotechnology Research: Applications in Nutritional Sciences" was organized to highlight emerging applications of nanotechnology to the food and nutrition sciences, as well as to suggest ways for further integration of these emerging technologies into nutrition research. Speakers focused on topics that included the problems and possibilities of introducing nanoparticles in clinical or nutrition settings, nanotechnology applications for increasing bioavailability of bioactive food components in new food products, nanotechnology opportunities in food science, as well as emerging safety and regulatory issues in this area, and the basic research applications such as the use of quantum dots to visualize cellular processes and protein-protein interactions. The session highlighted several emerging areas of potential utility in nutrition research. Nutrition scientists are encouraged to leverage ongoing efforts in nanomedicine through collaborations. These efforts could facilitate exploration of previously inaccessible cellular compartments and intracellular pathways and thus uncover strategies for new prevention and therapeutic modalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-124
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume140
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

Fingerprint

Nutritional Sciences
Nanotechnology
Food Technology
Research
Nanomedicine
Food
Quantum Dots
Nanoparticles
Biological Availability
Proteins
Research Personnel
Technology
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Srinivas, P. R., Philbert, M., Vu, T. T., Huang, Q., Kokini, J. L., Saos, E., ... Ross, S. A. (2010). Nanotechnology research: Applications in nutritional sciences. Journal of Nutrition, 140(1), 119-124. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.109.115048

Nanotechnology research : Applications in nutritional sciences. / Srinivas, Pothur R.; Philbert, Martin; Vu, Tothu (Tania); Huang, Qingrong; Kokini, Josef L.; Saos, Etta; Chen, Hongda; Peterson, Charles M.; Friedl, Karl E.; McDade-Ngutter, Crystal; Hubbard, Van; Starke-Reed, Pamela; Miller, Nancy; Betz, Joseph M.; Dwyer, Johanna; Milner, John; Ross, Sharon A.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 140, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 119-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Srinivas, PR, Philbert, M, Vu, TT, Huang, Q, Kokini, JL, Saos, E, Chen, H, Peterson, CM, Friedl, KE, McDade-Ngutter, C, Hubbard, V, Starke-Reed, P, Miller, N, Betz, JM, Dwyer, J, Milner, J & Ross, SA 2010, 'Nanotechnology research: Applications in nutritional sciences', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 140, no. 1, pp. 119-124. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.109.115048
Srinivas PR, Philbert M, Vu TT, Huang Q, Kokini JL, Saos E et al. Nanotechnology research: Applications in nutritional sciences. Journal of Nutrition. 2010 Jan;140(1):119-124. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.109.115048
Srinivas, Pothur R. ; Philbert, Martin ; Vu, Tothu (Tania) ; Huang, Qingrong ; Kokini, Josef L. ; Saos, Etta ; Chen, Hongda ; Peterson, Charles M. ; Friedl, Karl E. ; McDade-Ngutter, Crystal ; Hubbard, Van ; Starke-Reed, Pamela ; Miller, Nancy ; Betz, Joseph M. ; Dwyer, Johanna ; Milner, John ; Ross, Sharon A. / Nanotechnology research : Applications in nutritional sciences. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2010 ; Vol. 140, No. 1. pp. 119-124.
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