Myofascial pain syndromes and their evaluation

Robert (Rob) Bennett

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    83 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Myofascial pain refers to a specific form of soft-tissue rheumatism that results from irritable foci (trigger points) within skeletal muscles and their ligamentous junctions. It must be distinguished from bursitis, tendonitis, hypermobility syndromes, fibromyalgia and fasciitis. On the other hand it often exists as part of a clinical complex that includes these other soft-tissue conditions, i.e., it is not a diagnosis of exclusion. The clinical science of trigger points can be traced to the pioneering work of Kellgren in the 1930s, with his mapping of myotomal referral patterns of pain resulting from the injection of hypertonic saline into muscle and ligaments. Most muscles have characteristic myotomal patterns of referred pain; this feature forms the basis of the clinical recognition of myofascial trigger points in the form of a tender locus within a taut band of muscle which restricts the full range of motion and refers pain centrifugally when stimulated. Although myofascial pain syndromes have been described in the medical literature for about the last 100 years, it is only recently that scientific studies have revealed objective abnormalities.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)427-445
    Number of pages19
    JournalBest Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology
    Volume21
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 2007

    Fingerprint

    Myofascial Pain Syndromes
    Trigger Points
    Pain
    Muscles
    Referred Pain
    Fasciitis
    Bursitis
    Tendinopathy
    Fibromyalgia
    Articular Range of Motion
    Rheumatic Diseases
    Ligaments
    Skeletal Muscle
    Referral and Consultation
    Injections

    Keywords

    • central sensitization
    • fibromyalgia
    • myofascial
    • myotomal
    • pain
    • taut band
    • trigger points

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
    • Rheumatology

    Cite this

    Myofascial pain syndromes and their evaluation. / Bennett, Robert (Rob).

    In: Best Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology, Vol. 21, No. 3, 06.2007, p. 427-445.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Bennett, Robert (Rob). / Myofascial pain syndromes and their evaluation. In: Best Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology. 2007 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 427-445.
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