Muscle Strength and Physical Performance Are Associated With Risk of Postfracture Mortality But Not Subsequent Fracture in Men

Dima A. Alajlouni, Dana Bliuc, Thach S. Tran, Robert D. Blank, Peggy M. Cawthon, Kristine E. Ensrud, Nancy E. Lane, Eric S. Orwoll, Jane A. Cauley, Jacqueline R. Center

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Muscle strength and physical performance are associated with incident fractures and mortality. However, their role in the risk of subsequent fracture and postfracture mortality is not clear. We assessed the association between muscle strength (grip strength) and performance (gait speed and chair stands time) and the risk of subsequent fracture and mortality in 830 men with low-trauma index fracture, who participated in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) USA Study and had their index measurements assessed within 5 years prior to the index fracture. The annual decline in muscle strength and performance following index fracture, estimated using linear mixed-effects regression, was also examined in relation to mortality. The associations were assessed using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, femoral neck bone mineral density (FN BMD), prior fractures, falls, body mass index (BMI), index fracture site, lifestyle factors, and comorbidities. Over a median follow-up of 3.7 (interquartile range [IQR], 1.3–8.1) years from index fracture to subsequent fracture, 201 (24%) men had a subsequent fracture and over 5.1 (IQR, 1.8–9.6) years to death, and 536 (65%) men died. Index measurements were not associated with subsequent fracture (hazard ratios [HRs] ranging from 0.97 to 1.07). However, they were associated with postfracture mortality. HR (95% confidence interval [CI]) per 1 standard deviation (1-SD) decrement in grip strength: HR 1.12 (95% CI, 1.01–1.25) and gait speed: HR 1.14 (95% CI, 1.02–1.27), and 1-SD increment in chair stands time: HR 1.08 (95% CI, 0.97–1.21). Greater annual declines in these measurements were associated with higher mortality risk, independent of the index values and other covariates. HR (95% CI) per 1-SD annual decrement in change in grip strength: HR 1.15 (95% CI, 1.01–1.33) and in gait speed: HR 1.38 (95% CI, 1.13–1.68), and 1-SD annual increment in chair stands time: HR 1.28 (95% CI, 1.07–1.54). Men who were unable to complete one or multiple tests had greater risk of postfracture mortality (24%–109%) compared to those performed all tests. It remains to be seen whether improvement in these modifiable factors can reduce postfracture mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • AGING
  • FRACTURE PREVENTION
  • FRACTURE RISK ASSESSMENT SCREENING
  • GENERAL POPULATION STUDIES
  • MUSCLE STRENGTH
  • PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE
  • POST-FRACTURE MORTALITY
  • SARCOPENIA
  • SUBSEQUENT FRACTURE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Muscle Strength and Physical Performance Are Associated With Risk of Postfracture Mortality But Not Subsequent Fracture in Men'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this