Multivalent smallpox DNA vaccine delivered by intradermal electroporation drives protective immunity in nonhuman primates against lethal monkeypox challenge

Lauren A. Hirao, Ruxandra Draghia-Akli, Jonathan T. Prigge, Maria Yang, Abhishek Satishchandran, Ling Wu, Erika Hammarlund, Amir S. Khan, Tahar Babas, Lowrey Rhodes, Peter Silvera, Mark Slifka, Niranjan Y. Sardesai, David B. Weiner

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    52 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The threat of a smallpox-based bioterrorist event or a human monkeypox outbreak has heightened the importance of new, safe vaccine approaches for these pathogens to complement older poxviral vaccine platforms. As poxviruses are large, complex viruses, they present technological challenges for simple recombinant vaccine development where a multicomponent mixtures of vaccine antigens are likely important in protection. We report that a synthetic, multivalent, highly concentrated, DNA vaccine delivered by a minimally invasive, novel skin electroporation microarray can drive polyvalent immunity in macaques, and offers protection from a highly pathogenic monkeypox challenge. Such a diverse, high-titer antibody response produced against 8 different DNA-encoded antigens delivered simultaneously in microvolumes hasnot been previously described. These studies represent a significant improvement in the efficiency of the DNA vaccine platform, resulting in immune responses that mimic live viral infections, and would likely have relevance for vaccine design against complex human and animal pathogens.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)95-102
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
    Volume203
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

    Fingerprint

    Monkeypox
    Smallpox Vaccine
    DNA Vaccines
    Electroporation
    Primates
    Immunity
    Vaccines
    Poxviridae
    Antigens
    Synthetic Vaccines
    Smallpox
    Macaca
    Virus Diseases
    Antibody Formation
    Disease Outbreaks
    Viruses
    Skin
    DNA

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Infectious Diseases
    • Immunology and Allergy

    Cite this

    Multivalent smallpox DNA vaccine delivered by intradermal electroporation drives protective immunity in nonhuman primates against lethal monkeypox challenge. / Hirao, Lauren A.; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Prigge, Jonathan T.; Yang, Maria; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Wu, Ling; Hammarlund, Erika; Khan, Amir S.; Babas, Tahar; Rhodes, Lowrey; Silvera, Peter; Slifka, Mark; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Weiner, David B.

    In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 203, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 95-102.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Hirao, LA, Draghia-Akli, R, Prigge, JT, Yang, M, Satishchandran, A, Wu, L, Hammarlund, E, Khan, AS, Babas, T, Rhodes, L, Silvera, P, Slifka, M, Sardesai, NY & Weiner, DB 2011, 'Multivalent smallpox DNA vaccine delivered by intradermal electroporation drives protective immunity in nonhuman primates against lethal monkeypox challenge', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 203, no. 1, pp. 95-102. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiq017
    Hirao, Lauren A. ; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra ; Prigge, Jonathan T. ; Yang, Maria ; Satishchandran, Abhishek ; Wu, Ling ; Hammarlund, Erika ; Khan, Amir S. ; Babas, Tahar ; Rhodes, Lowrey ; Silvera, Peter ; Slifka, Mark ; Sardesai, Niranjan Y. ; Weiner, David B. / Multivalent smallpox DNA vaccine delivered by intradermal electroporation drives protective immunity in nonhuman primates against lethal monkeypox challenge. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2011 ; Vol. 203, No. 1. pp. 95-102.
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