Multiple pathways from the neighborhood food environment to increased body mass index through dietary behaviors

A structural equation-based analysis in the CARDIA study

Andrea S. Richardson, Katie A. Meyer, Annie Green Howard, Janne Heinonen, Barry M. Popkin, Kelly R. Evenson, James M. Shikany, Cora E. Lewis, Penny Gordon-Larsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine longitudinal pathways from multiple types of neighborhood restaurants and food stores to BMI, through dietary behaviors. Methods: We used data from participants (n=5114) in the United States-based Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study and a structural equation model to estimate longitudinal (1985-86 to 2005-06) pathways simultaneously from neighborhood fast food restaurants, sit-down restaurants, supermarkets, and convenience stores to BMI through dietary behaviors, controlling for socioeconomic status (SES) and physical activity. Results: Higher numbers of neighborhood fast food restaurants and lower numbers of sit-down restaurants were associated with higher consumption of an obesogenic fast food-type diet. The pathways from food stores to BMI through diet were inconsistent in magnitude and statistical significance. Conclusions: Efforts to decrease the numbers of neighborhood fast food restaurants and to increase the numbers of sit-down restaurant options could influence diet behaviors. Availability of neighborhood fast food and sit-down restaurants may play comparatively stronger roles than food stores in shaping dietary behaviors and BMI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-87
Number of pages14
JournalHealth and Place
Volume36
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

Restaurants
body mass
Fast Foods
Body Mass Index
food
Food
diet
Diet
physical activity
socioeconomic status
index
analysis
Structural Models
statistical significance
structural model
Social Class
young adult
Young Adult
social status
Coronary Vessels

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Diet
  • Geographic information systems
  • Longitudinal study
  • Neighborhood food environment
  • Structural equation model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Multiple pathways from the neighborhood food environment to increased body mass index through dietary behaviors : A structural equation-based analysis in the CARDIA study. / Richardson, Andrea S.; Meyer, Katie A.; Howard, Annie Green; Heinonen, Janne; Popkin, Barry M.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Shikany, James M.; Lewis, Cora E.; Gordon-Larsen, Penny.

In: Health and Place, Vol. 36, 01.12.2015, p. 74-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Richardson, Andrea S. ; Meyer, Katie A. ; Howard, Annie Green ; Heinonen, Janne ; Popkin, Barry M. ; Evenson, Kelly R. ; Shikany, James M. ; Lewis, Cora E. ; Gordon-Larsen, Penny. / Multiple pathways from the neighborhood food environment to increased body mass index through dietary behaviors : A structural equation-based analysis in the CARDIA study. In: Health and Place. 2015 ; Vol. 36. pp. 74-87.
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