MR connectomics: A conceptual framework for studying the developing brain

Patric Hagmann, Patricia E. Grant, Damien Fair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The combination of advanced neuroimaging techniques and major developments in complex network science, have given birth to a new framework for studying the brain: "connectomics." This framework provides the ability to describe and study the brain as a dynamic network and to explore how the coordination and integration of information processing may occur. In recent years this framework has been used to investigate the developing brain and has shed light on many dynamic changes occurring from infancy through adulthood. The aim of this article is to review this work and to discuss what we have learned from it. We will also use this body of work to highlight key technical aspects that are necessary in general for successful connectome analysis using today's advanced neuroimaging techniques. We look to identify current limitations of such approaches, what can be improved, and how these points generalize to other topics in connectome research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFrontiers in Systems Neuroscience
Issue numberJUNE 2012
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 13 2012

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Connectome
Neuroimaging
Brain
Automatic Data Processing
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Research

Keywords

  • Connectivity
  • Development
  • Diffusion MRI
  • Human brain
  • Networks
  • Resting state functional MRI
  • Tractography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

MR connectomics : A conceptual framework for studying the developing brain. / Hagmann, Patric; Grant, Patricia E.; Fair, Damien.

In: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, No. JUNE 2012, 13.06.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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