Motivational interviewing to increase physical activity in long-term cancer survivors

A randomized controlled trial

Jill Bennett, Karen Lyons, Kerri Winters-Stone, Lillian Nail, Jennifer Scherer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

120 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Physical activity can confer many benefits on cancer survivors, including relief of persistent symptoms related to cancer treatment. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of a motivational interviewing (MI) intervention on increasing physical activity (Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors questionnaire) and improving aerobic fitness (6-minute walk), health (Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36), and fatigue (Schwartz Cancer Fatigue Scale) in cancer survivors. A secondary purpose was to evaluate whether the effect of MI on physical activities depended on self-efficacy. METHODS: Fifty-six physically inactive adult cancer survivors (mean = 42 months since completion of treatment) were assigned randomly to intervention and control groups. The MI intervention consisted of one in-person counseling session followed by two MI telephone calls over 6 months. Control group participants received two telephone calls without MI content. Outcomes were measured at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months, and were analyzed using multilevel modeling. RESULTS: The results of the MI intervention explained significant group differences in regular physical activities (measured in caloric expenditure per week), controlling for time since completion of cancer treatment (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-27
Number of pages10
JournalNursing Research
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

Fingerprint

Motivational Interviewing
Survivors
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Neoplasms
Telephone
Fatigue
Control Groups
Second Primary Neoplasms
Self Efficacy
Health Expenditures
Counseling
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Health
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Exercise
  • Physical activity
  • Randomized controlled trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Motivational interviewing to increase physical activity in long-term cancer survivors : A randomized controlled trial. / Bennett, Jill; Lyons, Karen; Winters-Stone, Kerri; Nail, Lillian; Scherer, Jennifer.

In: Nursing Research, Vol. 56, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 18-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bennett, Jill ; Lyons, Karen ; Winters-Stone, Kerri ; Nail, Lillian ; Scherer, Jennifer. / Motivational interviewing to increase physical activity in long-term cancer survivors : A randomized controlled trial. In: Nursing Research. 2007 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 18-27.
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