Motivational interviewing to improve self-care for patients with chronic heart failure: MITI-HF randomized controlled trial

Ruth Masterson Creber, Megan Patey, Christopher Lee, Amy Kuan, Corrine Jurgens, Barbara Riegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a tailored motivational interviewing (MI) intervention versus usual care for improving HF self-care behaviors, physical HF symptoms and quality of life. Methods: This is a single-center, randomized controlled trial. Participants were enrolled in the hospital. Immediately after discharge, those in the intervention group received a single home visit and 3-4 follow-up phone calls by a nurse over 90 days. Results: A total of 67 participants completed the study (mean age 62 ± 12.8 years), of which 54% were African American, 30% were female, 84% had class III/IV symptoms, and 63% were educated at a high school level or less. There were no differences between the groups in self-care maintenance, self-care confidence, physical HF symptoms, or quality of life at 90 days. Conclusion: Patients who received the MI intervention had significant and clinically meaningful improvements in HF self-care maintenance over 90 days that exceeded that of usual care. Practice Implications: These data support the use of a nurse-led MI intervention for improving HF self-care. Identifying methods to improve HF self-care may lead to improved clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-264
Number of pages9
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume99
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Motivational Interviewing
Self Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Heart Failure
Nurses
Quality of Life
House Calls
African Americans

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Diet sodium-restricted
  • Heart failure
  • Motivational interviewing
  • Quality of life
  • Self care
  • Self efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Motivational interviewing to improve self-care for patients with chronic heart failure : MITI-HF randomized controlled trial. / Masterson Creber, Ruth; Patey, Megan; Lee, Christopher; Kuan, Amy; Jurgens, Corrine; Riegel, Barbara.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 99, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 256-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Masterson Creber, Ruth ; Patey, Megan ; Lee, Christopher ; Kuan, Amy ; Jurgens, Corrine ; Riegel, Barbara. / Motivational interviewing to improve self-care for patients with chronic heart failure : MITI-HF randomized controlled trial. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2016 ; Vol. 99, No. 2. pp. 256-264.
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