Momentary increase in plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide is involved in hot flashes in men treated with castration for carcinoma of the prostate

Peter A S Johnstone, Joel T. McFarland, Robert H. Riffenburgh, Christopher Amling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: In women the vasodilatory neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y seem to be involved in menopausal hot flashes. We assessed whether plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y change during hot flashes in men after castration. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 10 men 61 to 81 years old who underwent castration due to cancer of the prostate and had frequent hot flashes for changes in plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y during 1 day at the outpatient clinic. At least 5 blood samples were obtained between flashes and 4 were obtained during each flash. The samples were analyzed for calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y using radioimmunoassay technique. Hot flashes were objectively recorded by measuring peripheral skin temperature and skin conductance. Results: Plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide increased 46% (95% confidence interval 21 to 71) during flashes in the 6 men in whom it was measurable. This change was statistically significant (p=0.028). The concentration of neuropeptide Y was below the detection limit. Skin conductance and temperature increased significantly during flashes. Conclusions: Calcitonin gene-related peptide is involved in the mechanisms of hot flashes in men who underwent castration due to prostate carcinoma. Thus, there may be a similar mechanism of hot flashes in women and in men deprived of sex steroids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1720-1723
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume166
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hot Flashes
Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide
Castration
Neuropeptide Y
Prostate
Carcinoma
Skin Temperature
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Neuropeptides
Radioimmunoassay
Limit of Detection
Prostatic Neoplasms
Steroids
Confidence Intervals
Skin

Keywords

  • Calcitonin gene-related peptide
  • Carcinoma
  • Castration
  • Hot flashes
  • Prostate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Momentary increase in plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide is involved in hot flashes in men treated with castration for carcinoma of the prostate. / Johnstone, Peter A S; McFarland, Joel T.; Riffenburgh, Robert H.; Amling, Christopher.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 166, No. 5, 2001, p. 1720-1723.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: In women the vasodilatory neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y seem to be involved in menopausal hot flashes. We assessed whether plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y change during hot flashes in men after castration. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 10 men 61 to 81 years old who underwent castration due to cancer of the prostate and had frequent hot flashes for changes in plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y during 1 day at the outpatient clinic. At least 5 blood samples were obtained between flashes and 4 were obtained during each flash. The samples were analyzed for calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y using radioimmunoassay technique. Hot flashes were objectively recorded by measuring peripheral skin temperature and skin conductance. Results: Plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide increased 46{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval 21 to 71) during flashes in the 6 men in whom it was measurable. This change was statistically significant (p=0.028). The concentration of neuropeptide Y was below the detection limit. Skin conductance and temperature increased significantly during flashes. Conclusions: Calcitonin gene-related peptide is involved in the mechanisms of hot flashes in men who underwent castration due to prostate carcinoma. Thus, there may be a similar mechanism of hot flashes in women and in men deprived of sex steroids.",
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T1 - Momentary increase in plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide is involved in hot flashes in men treated with castration for carcinoma of the prostate

AU - Johnstone, Peter A S

AU - McFarland, Joel T.

AU - Riffenburgh, Robert H.

AU - Amling, Christopher

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Purpose: In women the vasodilatory neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y seem to be involved in menopausal hot flashes. We assessed whether plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y change during hot flashes in men after castration. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 10 men 61 to 81 years old who underwent castration due to cancer of the prostate and had frequent hot flashes for changes in plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y during 1 day at the outpatient clinic. At least 5 blood samples were obtained between flashes and 4 were obtained during each flash. The samples were analyzed for calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y using radioimmunoassay technique. Hot flashes were objectively recorded by measuring peripheral skin temperature and skin conductance. Results: Plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide increased 46% (95% confidence interval 21 to 71) during flashes in the 6 men in whom it was measurable. This change was statistically significant (p=0.028). The concentration of neuropeptide Y was below the detection limit. Skin conductance and temperature increased significantly during flashes. Conclusions: Calcitonin gene-related peptide is involved in the mechanisms of hot flashes in men who underwent castration due to prostate carcinoma. Thus, there may be a similar mechanism of hot flashes in women and in men deprived of sex steroids.

AB - Purpose: In women the vasodilatory neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y seem to be involved in menopausal hot flashes. We assessed whether plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y change during hot flashes in men after castration. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 10 men 61 to 81 years old who underwent castration due to cancer of the prostate and had frequent hot flashes for changes in plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y during 1 day at the outpatient clinic. At least 5 blood samples were obtained between flashes and 4 were obtained during each flash. The samples were analyzed for calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y using radioimmunoassay technique. Hot flashes were objectively recorded by measuring peripheral skin temperature and skin conductance. Results: Plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide increased 46% (95% confidence interval 21 to 71) during flashes in the 6 men in whom it was measurable. This change was statistically significant (p=0.028). The concentration of neuropeptide Y was below the detection limit. Skin conductance and temperature increased significantly during flashes. Conclusions: Calcitonin gene-related peptide is involved in the mechanisms of hot flashes in men who underwent castration due to prostate carcinoma. Thus, there may be a similar mechanism of hot flashes in women and in men deprived of sex steroids.

KW - Calcitonin gene-related peptide

KW - Carcinoma

KW - Castration

KW - Hot flashes

KW - Prostate

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