Modulation of the M. tuberculosis cell envelope between replicating and non-replicating persistent bacteria

Haley Stokas, Heather L. Rhodes, Georgiana E. Purdy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a human pathogen depends on the bacterium's ability to persist in a quiescent form in oxygen and nutrient-poor host environments. In vitro studies have demonstrated that these restricting environments induce a shift from bacterial replication to non-replicating persistence (NRP). Entry into NRP involves changes in bacterial metabolism and remodeling of the cell envelope. Findings consistent with the phenotypes observed in vitro have been observed in patient and animal model samples. This review focuses on the cell envelope differences seen between replicating and NRP M. tuberculosis and summarizes the ways in which serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs) may mediate this process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102007
JournalTuberculosis
Volume125
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Dormancy
  • Lipids
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  • Mycolic acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Modulation of the M. tuberculosis cell envelope between replicating and non-replicating persistent bacteria'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this