Modular organization of cognitive systems masked by interhemispheric integration

K. Baynes, J. C. Eliassen, Helmi Lutsep, M. S. Gazzaniga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

After resection of the corpus callosum, V.J., a left-handed woman with left-hemisphere dominance for spoken language, demonstrated a dissociation between spoken and written language. In the key experiment, words flashed to V.J.'s dominant left hemisphere were easily spoken out loud, but could not be written. However, when the words were flashed to her right hemisphere, she could not speak them out loud, but could write them with her left hand. This marked dissociation support the view that spoken and written language output can be controlled by independent hemispheres, even though before her hemispheric disconnection, they appeared as inseparable cognitive entities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)902-905
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume280
Issue number5365
DOIs
StatePublished - May 8 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Corpus Callosum
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Modular organization of cognitive systems masked by interhemispheric integration. / Baynes, K.; Eliassen, J. C.; Lutsep, Helmi; Gazzaniga, M. S.

In: Science, Vol. 280, No. 5365, 08.05.1998, p. 902-905.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baynes, K. ; Eliassen, J. C. ; Lutsep, Helmi ; Gazzaniga, M. S. / Modular organization of cognitive systems masked by interhemispheric integration. In: Science. 1998 ; Vol. 280, No. 5365. pp. 902-905.
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