Modeling the dynamic composition of engineered cartilage

Christopher G. Wilson, Sean Kohles, Lawrence J. Bonassar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Investigation of the mechanisms underlying scaffold degradation and neotissue synthesis is essential to understanding the mechanical and biological performance of engineered tissues. Modeling the dynamic composition of cell-polymer constructs may be useful in estimating the constructs' long-term function. In this preliminary study, we identified potential mechanisms and developed mathematical models to describe scaffold mass loss and extracellular matrix synthesis for engineered cartilage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED
EditorsB.B. Lieber
Pages15-16
Number of pages2
Volume51
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes
Event2001 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Nov 11 2001Nov 16 2001

Other

Other2001 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period11/11/0111/16/01

Fingerprint

Cartilage
Scaffolds
Chemical analysis
Tissue
Mathematical models
Degradation
Polymers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Wilson, C. G., Kohles, S., & Bonassar, L. J. (2001). Modeling the dynamic composition of engineered cartilage. In B. B. Lieber (Ed.), American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED (Vol. 51, pp. 15-16)

Modeling the dynamic composition of engineered cartilage. / Wilson, Christopher G.; Kohles, Sean; Bonassar, Lawrence J.

American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. ed. / B.B. Lieber. Vol. 51 2001. p. 15-16.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Wilson, CG, Kohles, S & Bonassar, LJ 2001, Modeling the dynamic composition of engineered cartilage. in BB Lieber (ed.), American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. vol. 51, pp. 15-16, 2001 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, New York, NY, United States, 11/11/01.
Wilson CG, Kohles S, Bonassar LJ. Modeling the dynamic composition of engineered cartilage. In Lieber BB, editor, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. Vol. 51. 2001. p. 15-16
Wilson, Christopher G. ; Kohles, Sean ; Bonassar, Lawrence J. / Modeling the dynamic composition of engineered cartilage. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. editor / B.B. Lieber. Vol. 51 2001. pp. 15-16
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