Misleading early blood volume changes obtained using ferumoxytol-based magnetic resonance imaging perfusion in high grade glial neoplasms treated with bevacizumab

Joao Prola Netto, Daniel Schwartz, Csanad Varallyay, Rongwei Fu, Bronwyn Hamilton, Edward A. Neuwelt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Neovascularization, a distinguishing trait of high-grade glioma, is a target for anti-angiogenic treatment with bevacizumab (BEV). This study sought to use ferumoxytol-based dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to clarify perfusion and relative blood volume (rCBV) changes in glioma treated with BEV and to determine potential impact on clinical management. Methods: 16 high grade glioma patients who received BEV following post-chemoradiation radiographic or clinical progression were included. Ferumoxytol-based MRI perfusion measurements were taken before and after BEV. Lesions were defined at each timepoint by gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA)-enhancing area. Lesion volume and rCBV were compared pre and post-BEV in the lesion and rCBV "hot spot" (mean of the highest rCBV in a 1.08 cm2 area in the enhancing volume), as well as hypoperfused and hyperperfused subvolumes within the GBCA-enhancing lesion. Results: GBCA-enhancing lesion volumes decreased 39% (P = 0.01) after BEV. Mean rCBV in post-BEV GBCA-enhancing area did not decrease significantly (P = 0.227) but significantly decreased in the hot spot (P = 0.046). Mean and hot spot rCBV decreased (P = 0.039 and 0.007) when post-BEV rCBV was calculated over the pre-BEV GBCA-enhancing area. Hypoperfused pixel count increased from 24% to 38 (P = 0.007) and hyperperfused decreased from 39 to 28% (P = 0.017). Mean rCBV decreased in 7/16 (44%) patients from >1.75 to <1.75, the cutoff for pseudoprogression diagnosis. Conclusions: Decreased perfusion after BEV significantly alters rCBV measurements when using ferumoxytol. BEV treatment response hinders efforts to differentiate true progression from pseudoprogression using blood volume measurements in malignant glioma, potentially impacting patient diagnosis and management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number23
JournalFluids and Barriers of the CNS
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 20 2016

Keywords

  • Bevacizumab
  • Ferumoxytol
  • High grade glioma
  • Perfusion MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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