Mindfulness Meditation for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Helana Wahbeh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

People with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience a constellation of often debilitating symptoms in three categories: hyper arousal, reexperiencing, and avoidance. While prolonged exposure and cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmaceuticals may offer some relief for some people, additional treatments are needed. Evidence for the use of clinical mindfulness interventions has grown in the last decade for many health conditions such as PTSD. The overlapping PTSD pathophysiology and mechanisms of action of mindfulness meditation support its use for treatment. Although still preliminary, the evidence for using mindfulness meditation is positive and growing. Special considerations must be used in implementing mindfulness interventions to account for sensitive issues in people with PTSD. Future research to inform clinical practice will include larger randomized controlled trials that incorporate state-of-the-art adherence and ecological momentary assessment measures to evaluate real-time practice and symptoms in the participant's natural setting. They will also include varied delivery options in addition to the standard group formats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Mindfulness
PublisherWiley Blackwell
Pages776-793
Number of pages18
Volume1-2
ISBN (Electronic)9781118294895
ISBN (Print)9781118294871
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 21 2014

Fingerprint

Mindfulness
Meditation
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Cognitive Therapy
Arousal
Randomized Controlled Trials
Health
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Clinical Western mindfulness meditation
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Wahbeh, H. (2014). Mindfulness Meditation for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. In The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Mindfulness (Vol. 1-2, pp. 776-793). Wiley Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118294895.ch39

Mindfulness Meditation for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. / Wahbeh, Helana.

The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Mindfulness. Vol. 1-2 Wiley Blackwell, 2014. p. 776-793.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Wahbeh, H 2014, Mindfulness Meditation for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. in The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Mindfulness. vol. 1-2, Wiley Blackwell, pp. 776-793. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118294895.ch39
Wahbeh H. Mindfulness Meditation for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. In The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Mindfulness. Vol. 1-2. Wiley Blackwell. 2014. p. 776-793 https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118294895.ch39
Wahbeh, Helana. / Mindfulness Meditation for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Mindfulness. Vol. 1-2 Wiley Blackwell, 2014. pp. 776-793
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