Mindful Nonreactivity Moderates the Relationship between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression

Josh Kaplan, Vanessa Somohano, Ashley Eddy, Barry Oken, Helana Wahbeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

PTSD and depression represent major individual and societal burdens. Depression is commonly comorbid with PTSD among veterans, although buffers of this relationship are unclear. We evaluated whether facets of mindfulness moderated the relationship between PTSD and depression in veterans with PTSD (N = 70). Three facets—nonjudging, acting with awareness, and nonreactivity—were assessed as moderators. Results indicated nonreactivity significantly attenuated the relationship between PTSD and depression (p=.013), such that veterans with high nonreactivity (+1 SD) showed a nonsignificant relationship between PTSD and depression, whereas veterans with average (Mean; p <.001) and low (−1 SD; p <.001) nonreactivity exhibited a significant relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Loss and Trauma
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Posttraumatic stress disorder
  • mindfulness
  • veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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