Microvascular remodeling and accelerated hyperemia blood flow restoration in arterially occluded skeletal muscle exposed to ultrasonic microbubble destruction

Ji Song, Patrick S. Cottler, Alexander L. Klibanov, Sanjiv Kaul, Richard J. Price

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We showed previously that microbubble destruction with pulsed 1-MHz ultrasound creates a bioeffect that stimulates arteriogenesis and a chronic increase in hyperemia blood flow in normal rat muscle. Here we tested whether ultrasonic microbubble destruction can be used to create a microvascular remodeling response that restores hyperemia blood flow to rat skeletal muscle affected by arterial occlusion. Pulsed ultrasound (1 MHz) was applied to gracilis muscles in which the lateral feed artery was occluded but the medial feed artery was left intact. Control muscles were similarly occluded but did not receive ultrasound, microbubbles, or both. Hyperemia blood flow and number of smooth muscle (SM) α-actin-positive vessels, >30-μm arterioles, and capillaries per fiber were determined 7, 14, and 28 days after treatment. In ultrasound-microbubble-treated muscles, lateral region hyperemia blood flow was increased at all time points and restored to normal at day 28. The number of SM α-actin vessels per fiber was increased over control in this region at days 7 and 14 but decreased by day 28, when larger-diameter arterioles became more prevalent in the medial region. The number of capillaries per fiber was increased over control only at day 7 in the lateral region and only at days 7 and 14 in the medial region, indicating that the angiogenesis response was transient and likely did not contribute significantly to flow restoration at day 28. We conclude that ultrasonic microbubble destruction can be tailored to stimulate an arteriogenesis response that restores hyperemia blood flow to skeletal muscle in a rat model of arterial occlusion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume287
Issue number6 56-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Microbubbles
Hyperemia
Ultrasonics
Skeletal Muscle
Arterioles
Muscles
Smooth Muscle
Actins
Arteries

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Contrast media
  • Microcirculation
  • Revascularization
  • Ultrasonics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Microvascular remodeling and accelerated hyperemia blood flow restoration in arterially occluded skeletal muscle exposed to ultrasonic microbubble destruction. / Song, Ji; Cottler, Patrick S.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Kaul, Sanjiv; Price, Richard J.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 287, No. 6 56-6, 12.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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