Microdialysis studies of brain norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine release during ingestive behavior. Theoretical and clinical implications

B. G. Hoebel, L. Hernandez, D. H. Schwartz, Gregory Mark, G. A. Hunter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

199 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This minireview deals with the possible roles of monoamines in feeding and feeding disorders. The introduction sketches the results of earlier studies with local drug injections and selective neurotoxins which provided pharmacological evidence that monoamines can influence food intake and body weight. A table summarizing this evidence is used to list monoamine changes that could underlie anorexia or hyperphagia. It is apparent that abnormalities in the monoamines, along with their cotransmitters, could cause many forms of feeding disorder. It is proposed as a working hypothesis that several varieties of hyperphagia leading to obesity have a common element. This common factor is a change in excitability of a lateral hypothalamic reinforcement system as manifested in self-stimulation at a stimulation-bound feeding site. Understanding this feeding reward-aversion system helps us understand hyperphagia and anorexia. The neurochemistry of reward and aversion involves the monoamines. This paper focuses on dopamine and serotonin. The data support the hypothesis that dopamine systems projecting to the nucleus accumbens and other forebrain areas from the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) are important for approach and positive reinforcement in ingestive behavior and self-stimulation. Serotonin is hypothesized to facilitate satiety and inhibition of feeding reward in the hypothalamus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-193
Number of pages23
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume575
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hyperphagia
Microdialysis
Reward
Self Stimulation
Dopamine
Brain
Serotonin
Norepinephrine
Anorexia
Neurochemistry
Ventral Tegmental Area
Nucleus Accumbens
Neurotoxins
Prosencephalon
Mesencephalon
Hypothalamus
Reinforcement
Obesity
Eating
Body Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Microdialysis studies of brain norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine release during ingestive behavior. Theoretical and clinical implications. / Hoebel, B. G.; Hernandez, L.; Schwartz, D. H.; Mark, Gregory; Hunter, G. A.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 575, 1989, p. 171-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{98def8786b3e4772a7c8971c1689c709,
title = "Microdialysis studies of brain norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine release during ingestive behavior. Theoretical and clinical implications",
abstract = "This minireview deals with the possible roles of monoamines in feeding and feeding disorders. The introduction sketches the results of earlier studies with local drug injections and selective neurotoxins which provided pharmacological evidence that monoamines can influence food intake and body weight. A table summarizing this evidence is used to list monoamine changes that could underlie anorexia or hyperphagia. It is apparent that abnormalities in the monoamines, along with their cotransmitters, could cause many forms of feeding disorder. It is proposed as a working hypothesis that several varieties of hyperphagia leading to obesity have a common element. This common factor is a change in excitability of a lateral hypothalamic reinforcement system as manifested in self-stimulation at a stimulation-bound feeding site. Understanding this feeding reward-aversion system helps us understand hyperphagia and anorexia. The neurochemistry of reward and aversion involves the monoamines. This paper focuses on dopamine and serotonin. The data support the hypothesis that dopamine systems projecting to the nucleus accumbens and other forebrain areas from the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) are important for approach and positive reinforcement in ingestive behavior and self-stimulation. Serotonin is hypothesized to facilitate satiety and inhibition of feeding reward in the hypothalamus.",
author = "Hoebel, {B. G.} and L. Hernandez and Schwartz, {D. H.} and Gregory Mark and Hunter, {G. A.}",
year = "1989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "575",
pages = "171--193",
journal = "Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences",
issn = "0077-8923",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Microdialysis studies of brain norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine release during ingestive behavior. Theoretical and clinical implications

AU - Hoebel, B. G.

AU - Hernandez, L.

AU - Schwartz, D. H.

AU - Mark, Gregory

AU - Hunter, G. A.

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - This minireview deals with the possible roles of monoamines in feeding and feeding disorders. The introduction sketches the results of earlier studies with local drug injections and selective neurotoxins which provided pharmacological evidence that monoamines can influence food intake and body weight. A table summarizing this evidence is used to list monoamine changes that could underlie anorexia or hyperphagia. It is apparent that abnormalities in the monoamines, along with their cotransmitters, could cause many forms of feeding disorder. It is proposed as a working hypothesis that several varieties of hyperphagia leading to obesity have a common element. This common factor is a change in excitability of a lateral hypothalamic reinforcement system as manifested in self-stimulation at a stimulation-bound feeding site. Understanding this feeding reward-aversion system helps us understand hyperphagia and anorexia. The neurochemistry of reward and aversion involves the monoamines. This paper focuses on dopamine and serotonin. The data support the hypothesis that dopamine systems projecting to the nucleus accumbens and other forebrain areas from the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) are important for approach and positive reinforcement in ingestive behavior and self-stimulation. Serotonin is hypothesized to facilitate satiety and inhibition of feeding reward in the hypothalamus.

AB - This minireview deals with the possible roles of monoamines in feeding and feeding disorders. The introduction sketches the results of earlier studies with local drug injections and selective neurotoxins which provided pharmacological evidence that monoamines can influence food intake and body weight. A table summarizing this evidence is used to list monoamine changes that could underlie anorexia or hyperphagia. It is apparent that abnormalities in the monoamines, along with their cotransmitters, could cause many forms of feeding disorder. It is proposed as a working hypothesis that several varieties of hyperphagia leading to obesity have a common element. This common factor is a change in excitability of a lateral hypothalamic reinforcement system as manifested in self-stimulation at a stimulation-bound feeding site. Understanding this feeding reward-aversion system helps us understand hyperphagia and anorexia. The neurochemistry of reward and aversion involves the monoamines. This paper focuses on dopamine and serotonin. The data support the hypothesis that dopamine systems projecting to the nucleus accumbens and other forebrain areas from the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) are important for approach and positive reinforcement in ingestive behavior and self-stimulation. Serotonin is hypothesized to facilitate satiety and inhibition of feeding reward in the hypothalamus.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024951451&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024951451&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 575

SP - 171

EP - 193

JO - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

JF - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

SN - 0077-8923

ER -