Methamphetamine exposure during brain development alters the brain acetylcholine system in adolescent mice

Jessica A. Siegel, Byung Park, Jacob Raber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children exposed to methamphetamine during brain development as a result of maternal drug use have long-term hippocampus-dependent cognitive impairments, but the mechanisms underlying these impairments are not understood. The acetylcholine system plays an important role in cognitive function and potential methamphetamine-induced acetylcholine alterations may be related to methamphetamine-induced cognitive impairments. In this study, we investigated the potential long-term effects of methamphetamine exposure during hippocampal development on the acetylcholine system in adolescence mice on postnatal day 30 and in adult mice on postnatal day 90. Methamphetamine exposure increased the density of acetylcholine neurons in regions of the basal forebrain and the area occupied by acetylcholine axons in the hippocampus in adolescent female mice. In contrast, methamphetamine exposure did not affect the density of GABA cells or total neurons in the basal forebrain. Methamphetamine exposure also increased the number of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus of adolescent male and female mice. Our results demonstrate for the first time that methamphetamine exposure during hippocampal development affects the acetylcholine system in adolescent mice and that these changes are more profound in females than males.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-99
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume119
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Methamphetamine
Acetylcholine
Brain
Hippocampus
Neurons
GABAergic Neurons
Muscarinic Receptors
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Cognition
Axons
Mothers
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • acetylcholine
  • adolescence
  • basal forebrain
  • development
  • hippocampus
  • methamphetamine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Methamphetamine exposure during brain development alters the brain acetylcholine system in adolescent mice. / Siegel, Jessica A.; Park, Byung; Raber, Jacob.

In: Journal of Neurochemistry, Vol. 119, No. 1, 10.2011, p. 89-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0241fa436d204287b29ee707c43d957d,
title = "Methamphetamine exposure during brain development alters the brain acetylcholine system in adolescent mice",
abstract = "Children exposed to methamphetamine during brain development as a result of maternal drug use have long-term hippocampus-dependent cognitive impairments, but the mechanisms underlying these impairments are not understood. The acetylcholine system plays an important role in cognitive function and potential methamphetamine-induced acetylcholine alterations may be related to methamphetamine-induced cognitive impairments. In this study, we investigated the potential long-term effects of methamphetamine exposure during hippocampal development on the acetylcholine system in adolescence mice on postnatal day 30 and in adult mice on postnatal day 90. Methamphetamine exposure increased the density of acetylcholine neurons in regions of the basal forebrain and the area occupied by acetylcholine axons in the hippocampus in adolescent female mice. In contrast, methamphetamine exposure did not affect the density of GABA cells or total neurons in the basal forebrain. Methamphetamine exposure also increased the number of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus of adolescent male and female mice. Our results demonstrate for the first time that methamphetamine exposure during hippocampal development affects the acetylcholine system in adolescent mice and that these changes are more profound in females than males.",
keywords = "acetylcholine, adolescence, basal forebrain, development, hippocampus, methamphetamine",
author = "Siegel, {Jessica A.} and Byung Park and Jacob Raber",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1111/j.1471-4159.2011.07418.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "119",
pages = "89--99",
journal = "Journal of Neurochemistry",
issn = "0022-3042",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Methamphetamine exposure during brain development alters the brain acetylcholine system in adolescent mice

AU - Siegel, Jessica A.

AU - Park, Byung

AU - Raber, Jacob

PY - 2011/10

Y1 - 2011/10

N2 - Children exposed to methamphetamine during brain development as a result of maternal drug use have long-term hippocampus-dependent cognitive impairments, but the mechanisms underlying these impairments are not understood. The acetylcholine system plays an important role in cognitive function and potential methamphetamine-induced acetylcholine alterations may be related to methamphetamine-induced cognitive impairments. In this study, we investigated the potential long-term effects of methamphetamine exposure during hippocampal development on the acetylcholine system in adolescence mice on postnatal day 30 and in adult mice on postnatal day 90. Methamphetamine exposure increased the density of acetylcholine neurons in regions of the basal forebrain and the area occupied by acetylcholine axons in the hippocampus in adolescent female mice. In contrast, methamphetamine exposure did not affect the density of GABA cells or total neurons in the basal forebrain. Methamphetamine exposure also increased the number of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus of adolescent male and female mice. Our results demonstrate for the first time that methamphetamine exposure during hippocampal development affects the acetylcholine system in adolescent mice and that these changes are more profound in females than males.

AB - Children exposed to methamphetamine during brain development as a result of maternal drug use have long-term hippocampus-dependent cognitive impairments, but the mechanisms underlying these impairments are not understood. The acetylcholine system plays an important role in cognitive function and potential methamphetamine-induced acetylcholine alterations may be related to methamphetamine-induced cognitive impairments. In this study, we investigated the potential long-term effects of methamphetamine exposure during hippocampal development on the acetylcholine system in adolescence mice on postnatal day 30 and in adult mice on postnatal day 90. Methamphetamine exposure increased the density of acetylcholine neurons in regions of the basal forebrain and the area occupied by acetylcholine axons in the hippocampus in adolescent female mice. In contrast, methamphetamine exposure did not affect the density of GABA cells or total neurons in the basal forebrain. Methamphetamine exposure also increased the number of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus of adolescent male and female mice. Our results demonstrate for the first time that methamphetamine exposure during hippocampal development affects the acetylcholine system in adolescent mice and that these changes are more profound in females than males.

KW - acetylcholine

KW - adolescence

KW - basal forebrain

KW - development

KW - hippocampus

KW - methamphetamine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80052649693&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80052649693&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2011.07418.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2011.07418.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 21824143

AN - SCOPUS:80052649693

VL - 119

SP - 89

EP - 99

JO - Journal of Neurochemistry

JF - Journal of Neurochemistry

SN - 0022-3042

IS - 1

ER -