Memory testing in dementia: How much is enough?

Douglas S. Derrer, Diane B. Howieson, Erin A. Mueller, Richard M. Camicioli, Gary Sexton, Jeffrey A. Kaye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Analyses of eight widely used memory measures (Word List Acquisition and Recall used in the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale and the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease neuropsychology battery, Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised [WMS-R] Logical Memory I and II, WMS-R Visual Reproduction I and II, the memory scores from the Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination [NCSE], memory scores from the Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE]), and the MMSE total score showed each to have moderate predictive power in differentiating between patients with mild dementia and healthy normal controls. When these instruments were combined in a logistic regression analysis, three of them had substantial predictive power. Together, the Word List Acquisition, WMS-R Logical Memory II, and WMS-R Visual Reproduction II were 97.26% accurate (100% sensitive and 94.59% specific) in distinguishing these two groups. The Word List Acquisition is a brief test that alone had high accuracy (92%). These memory tests are highly useful in the diagnosis of mild dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Derrer, D. S., Howieson, D. B., Mueller, E. A., Camicioli, R. M., Sexton, G., & Kaye, J. A. (2001). Memory testing in dementia: How much is enough? Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 14(1), 1-6. https://doi.org/10.1177/089198870101400102