Meibomian gland function and giant papillary conjunctivitis

William Mathers, M. Billborough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined 42 contact lens-wearing patients for clinical evidence of giant papillary conjunctivitis and for meibomian gland dysfunction with gland dropout. Fifteen patients were free of clinical signs and symptoms of giant papillary conjunctivitis, whereas 27 had clinical symptoms and evidence of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Patients with giant papillary conjunctivitis had significantly more gland dropout with an average of 0.6 ± 1.2 gland absent in both lower eyelids compared with 0.2 ± 0.4 gland absent in patients without giant papillary conjunctivitis. Additionally, the viscosity of meibomian gland excreta was greater in the giant papillary conjunctivitis group. There was no difference in tear osmolarity or in the Schirmer test results between the two groups. These results indicated patients with giant papillary conjunctivitis were more likely to have meibomian gland dysfunction with gland dropout than patients without giant papillary conjunctivitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)188-192
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume114
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Meibomian Glands
Allergic Conjunctivitis
Patient Dropouts
Contact Lenses
Eyelids
Tears
Viscosity
Osmolar Concentration
Signs and Symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Meibomian gland function and giant papillary conjunctivitis. / Mathers, William; Billborough, M.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 114, No. 2, 1992, p. 188-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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