Medical student views on interactions with pharmaceutical representatives

Linda Ganzini, Zunqiu Chen, Dawn Peters, Sahana Misra, Madison Macht, Molly Osborne, George Keepers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: In 2006, the Housestaff Association presented the Dean at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) with a proposal to effectively end the influence of the pharmaceutical industry on campus. The Dean convened a workgroup to examine the issue, and faculty, residents, and medical students were surveyed on their views and interactions. Authors present here the responses from medical students. Methods: A web-based, anonymous survey was sent to all OHSU medical students in 2007; 59% completed it. The survey included items measuring attitudes about the pharmaceutical industry and interactions with pharmaceutical representatives (PRs). Results: Only 5% of clinical and 7% of preclinical students agreed that PRs have an important teaching role, and fewer than 1 in 6 believed that PRs provided useful and accurate information on either new or established drugs; 54% of clinical students indicated that PRs should be restricted from making presentations on campus, versus 32% of preclinical students, and only 30% of clinical students agreed that accepting gifts had no impact on their own prescribing, versus 50% of preclinical students. Students who acknowledged the influence of PRs and perceived less educational benefit were less likely to accept gifts such as textbooks; however, 84% of clinical students had attended an on-campus event sponsored by a pharmaceutical company in the previous year. Conclusions: Only a small proportion of OHSU medical students value interactions with PRs, but many still attend events sponsored by pharmaceutical companies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-187
Number of pages5
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Medical Students
pharmaceutical
medical student
Students
interaction
Pharmaceutical Preparations
student
pharmaceutical industry
Gift Giving
gift
Drug Industry
science
health
Health
event
Textbooks
textbook
Teaching
resident
drug

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Education
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Medical student views on interactions with pharmaceutical representatives. / Ganzini, Linda; Chen, Zunqiu; Peters, Dawn; Misra, Sahana; Macht, Madison; Osborne, Molly; Keepers, George.

In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 36, No. 3, 05.2012, p. 183-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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