Mechanisms that determine plasma cell lifespan and the duration of humoral immunity

Ian J. Amanna, Mark Slifka

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    153 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Humoral immunity following vaccination or infection is mainly derived from two types of cells: memory B cells and plasma cells. Memory B cells do not actively secrete antibody but instead maintain their immunoglobulin in the membrane-bound form that serves as the antigen-specific B-cell receptor. In contrast, plasma cells are terminally differentiated cells that no longer express surface-bound immunoglobulin but continuously secrete antibody without requiring further antigenic stimulation. Pre-existing serum or mucosal antibody elicited by plasma cells (or other intermediate antibody-secreting cells) represents the first line of defense against reinfection and is critical for protection against many microbial diseases. However, the mechanisms involved with maintaining long-term antibody production are not fully understood. Here, we examine several models of long-term humoral immunity and present a new model, described as the 'Imprinted Lifespan' model of plasma cell longevity. The foundation of this model is that plasma cells are imprinted with a predetermined lifespan based on the magnitude of B-cell signaling that occurs during the induction of an antigen-specific humoral immune response. This represents a testable hypothesis and may explain why some antigen-specific antibody responses fade over time whereas others are maintained essentially for life.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)125-138
    Number of pages14
    JournalImmunological Reviews
    Volume236
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 2010

    Fingerprint

    Humoral Immunity
    Plasma Cells
    B-Cell Antigen Receptors
    B-Lymphocytes
    Antibody Formation
    Antibodies
    Antigens
    Antibody-Producing Cells
    Vaccination
    Infection
    Serum

    Keywords

    • Antibody
    • Immunological memory
    • Memory B cell
    • Plasma cell

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Immunology
    • Immunology and Allergy

    Cite this

    Mechanisms that determine plasma cell lifespan and the duration of humoral immunity. / Amanna, Ian J.; Slifka, Mark.

    In: Immunological Reviews, Vol. 236, No. 1, 07.2010, p. 125-138.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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