Mechanism of morphine induced shifts in blood volume between extracorporeal reservoir and the systemic circulation of the dog under conditions of constant blood flow and vena caval pressures

J. F. Green, A. P. Jackman, Kenneth Krohn

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mechanism of a morphine-induced shift in blood volume between an extracorporeal reservoir and the systemic circulation of a dog under conditions of constant blood flow and vena caval pressure was investigated in 10 anesthetized dogs with the aid of right heart bypass. All blood returning to the heart was removed from the right atrial appendage and, after passing through a Starling resistor, drained by gravity into an extracorporeal reservoir. It then was pumped around a NaJ(Tl) scintillation crystal, through a heat exchanger and a flowmeter, and returned directly into the pulmonary artery. The following data (mean ± SE) were obtained with the pump flow set at 80 ml.min-1.kg-1. By the 5th minute following the administration of morphine, 4 mg/kg, arterial pressure fell from 99 ± 5 to 59 ± 6 mm Hg (P113mIn-tagged plasma tracer, decreased by 317 ± 32 ml in 15 minutes. Thus, following the administration of morphine, 58% of the decrease in reservoir volume was accounted for by fluid lost from the circulatory system. This filtration was preceded by an immediate 30% rise in the counts/min obtained from a scintillation probe positioned over the liver, suggesting a similar rise in liver volume. These counts remained elevated throughout the experiment. Ascites volume determined by an indicator dilution technique steadily increased from 78 ± 24 ml at the time of morphine administration to 276 ± 44 ml (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-486
Number of pages8
JournalCirculation Research
Volume42
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1978
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Venae Cavae
Blood Volume
Morphine
Dogs
Pressure
Right Heart Bypass
Starlings
Indicator Dilution Techniques
Flowmeters
Atrial Appendage
Liver
Gravitation
Cardiovascular System
Ascites
Pulmonary Artery
Arterial Pressure
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Mechanism of morphine induced shifts in blood volume between extracorporeal reservoir and the systemic circulation of the dog under conditions of constant blood flow and vena caval pressures",
abstract = "The mechanism of a morphine-induced shift in blood volume between an extracorporeal reservoir and the systemic circulation of a dog under conditions of constant blood flow and vena caval pressure was investigated in 10 anesthetized dogs with the aid of right heart bypass. All blood returning to the heart was removed from the right atrial appendage and, after passing through a Starling resistor, drained by gravity into an extracorporeal reservoir. It then was pumped around a NaJ(Tl) scintillation crystal, through a heat exchanger and a flowmeter, and returned directly into the pulmonary artery. The following data (mean ± SE) were obtained with the pump flow set at 80 ml.min-1.kg-1. By the 5th minute following the administration of morphine, 4 mg/kg, arterial pressure fell from 99 ± 5 to 59 ± 6 mm Hg (P113mIn-tagged plasma tracer, decreased by 317 ± 32 ml in 15 minutes. Thus, following the administration of morphine, 58{\%} of the decrease in reservoir volume was accounted for by fluid lost from the circulatory system. This filtration was preceded by an immediate 30{\%} rise in the counts/min obtained from a scintillation probe positioned over the liver, suggesting a similar rise in liver volume. These counts remained elevated throughout the experiment. Ascites volume determined by an indicator dilution technique steadily increased from 78 ± 24 ml at the time of morphine administration to 276 ± 44 ml (P",
author = "Green, {J. F.} and Jackman, {A. P.} and Kenneth Krohn",
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T1 - Mechanism of morphine induced shifts in blood volume between extracorporeal reservoir and the systemic circulation of the dog under conditions of constant blood flow and vena caval pressures

AU - Green, J. F.

AU - Jackman, A. P.

AU - Krohn, Kenneth

PY - 1978

Y1 - 1978

N2 - The mechanism of a morphine-induced shift in blood volume between an extracorporeal reservoir and the systemic circulation of a dog under conditions of constant blood flow and vena caval pressure was investigated in 10 anesthetized dogs with the aid of right heart bypass. All blood returning to the heart was removed from the right atrial appendage and, after passing through a Starling resistor, drained by gravity into an extracorporeal reservoir. It then was pumped around a NaJ(Tl) scintillation crystal, through a heat exchanger and a flowmeter, and returned directly into the pulmonary artery. The following data (mean ± SE) were obtained with the pump flow set at 80 ml.min-1.kg-1. By the 5th minute following the administration of morphine, 4 mg/kg, arterial pressure fell from 99 ± 5 to 59 ± 6 mm Hg (P113mIn-tagged plasma tracer, decreased by 317 ± 32 ml in 15 minutes. Thus, following the administration of morphine, 58% of the decrease in reservoir volume was accounted for by fluid lost from the circulatory system. This filtration was preceded by an immediate 30% rise in the counts/min obtained from a scintillation probe positioned over the liver, suggesting a similar rise in liver volume. These counts remained elevated throughout the experiment. Ascites volume determined by an indicator dilution technique steadily increased from 78 ± 24 ml at the time of morphine administration to 276 ± 44 ml (P

AB - The mechanism of a morphine-induced shift in blood volume between an extracorporeal reservoir and the systemic circulation of a dog under conditions of constant blood flow and vena caval pressure was investigated in 10 anesthetized dogs with the aid of right heart bypass. All blood returning to the heart was removed from the right atrial appendage and, after passing through a Starling resistor, drained by gravity into an extracorporeal reservoir. It then was pumped around a NaJ(Tl) scintillation crystal, through a heat exchanger and a flowmeter, and returned directly into the pulmonary artery. The following data (mean ± SE) were obtained with the pump flow set at 80 ml.min-1.kg-1. By the 5th minute following the administration of morphine, 4 mg/kg, arterial pressure fell from 99 ± 5 to 59 ± 6 mm Hg (P113mIn-tagged plasma tracer, decreased by 317 ± 32 ml in 15 minutes. Thus, following the administration of morphine, 58% of the decrease in reservoir volume was accounted for by fluid lost from the circulatory system. This filtration was preceded by an immediate 30% rise in the counts/min obtained from a scintillation probe positioned over the liver, suggesting a similar rise in liver volume. These counts remained elevated throughout the experiment. Ascites volume determined by an indicator dilution technique steadily increased from 78 ± 24 ml at the time of morphine administration to 276 ± 44 ml (P

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