Mechanism of ion transport by avian salt gland primary cell cultures

R. J. Lowy, D. C. Dawson, S. A. Ernst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Confluent sheets formed from primary culture of avian salt gland secretory cells exhibit a short-circuit current (I(sc)) in response to cholinergic and β-adrenergic stimulation [Lowy, R.J., D.C Dawson, and S.A. Ernst. Am J. Physiol. 249 (Cell Physiol. 18): C41-C47, 1985]. To establish the ionic basis for the I(sc) transmural fluxes of 22Na and 36Cl were measured. Under short-circuit conditions there was little net flux of either iron in the absence of agonists. Addition of carbachol elevated net serosal-to-mucosal Cl flux to 1.71 μeq·h-1·cm-2, whereas a smaller increase to 0.85 μeq·h-1·cm-2 occurred with isoproterenol. Neither agonist altered net Na flux. The stimulated I(sc) accounted for 70% of the net Cl flux induced by carbachol and nearly 100% of that induced by isoproterenol. Replacement of Cl by gluconate or Na by choline abolished (carbachol) or greatly reduced (isoproterenol) the I(sc), which could be restored in a dose-dependent fashion by ion restitution. Active ion transport was preferentially inhibited by basal (vs. apical) addition of ouabain, furosemide, or barium. The results provide evidence that cholinergic and β-adrenergic agonists elicit active transmural Cl secretion. They further suggest that transport is dependent on the Na+-K+-adenosine-triphosphatase, a Na-Cl contransport process, and a basal K conductance, all features of a secondary active Cl secretory mechanism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume256
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Salt Gland
Primary Cell Culture
Ion Transport
Carbachol
Isoproterenol
Cholinergic Agonists
Adrenergic Agonists
Furosemide
Ouabain
Barium
Choline
Adrenergic Agents
Cholinergic Agents
Adenosine Triphosphatases
Iron
Ions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Mechanism of ion transport by avian salt gland primary cell cultures. / Lowy, R. J.; Dawson, D. C.; Ernst, S. A.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 256, No. 6, 1989.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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