Mechanism of acute ascites formation after trauma resuscitation

John C. Mayberry, Kenneth J. Welker, Robert K. Goldman, Richard Mullins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Severely injured patients have been observed to acutely develop ascites; however, the pathogenesis of this rare phenomenon is poorly understood. Objectives: To report the factors common among severely injured patients developing ascites and to formulate a hypothesis regarding its origin. Methods: Retrospective review of case series. Results: We identified 9 injured patients between January 1, 1993, and December 31, 1998, who acutely developed significant amounts of ascites. The mean ± SD estimated ascites volume was 2.0 ± 0.8 L. All 9 patients had severe shock and were mechanically ventilated before abdominal decompression for the abdominal compartment syndrome. The mean ± SD peak inspiratory pressure was 39.0 ± 5.8 cm H2O. The mean ± SD volumes of crystalloid and blood product infusion before decompression were 16.1 ± 10.2 L and 5.2 ± 4.8 L, respectively, in a mean ± SD of 17 ± 15 hours. In comparison, the mean ± SD volumes of crystalloid and blood product transfusion among 100 contemporary, randomly selected patients undergoing trauma laparotomy were 5.1 ± 5.5 L and 1.1 ± 2.5 L, respectively (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)773-776
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume138
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Ascites
Resuscitation
Wounds and Injuries
Intra-Abdominal Hypertension
Lower Body Negative Pressure
Decompression
Blood Volume
Blood Transfusion
Laparotomy
Shock
Pressure
crystalloid solutions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Mechanism of acute ascites formation after trauma resuscitation. / Mayberry, John C.; Welker, Kenneth J.; Goldman, Robert K.; Mullins, Richard.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 138, No. 7, 01.07.2003, p. 773-776.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mayberry, John C. ; Welker, Kenneth J. ; Goldman, Robert K. ; Mullins, Richard. / Mechanism of acute ascites formation after trauma resuscitation. In: Archives of Surgery. 2003 ; Vol. 138, No. 7. pp. 773-776.
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