Medición de la idoneidad de la atención sanitaria prenatal

Un estudio transversal nacional en México

Translated title of the contribution: Measuring the adequacy of antenatal health care: A national cross-sectional study in Mexico

Ileana Heredia-Pi, Edson Servan-Mori, Blair Darney, Hortensia Reyes-Morales, Rafael Lozano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To propose an antenatal care classification for measuring the continuum of health care based on the concept of adequacy: timeliness of entry into antenatal care, number of antenatal care visits and key processes of care. Methods In a cross-sectional, retrospective study we used data from the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT) in 2012. This contained self-reported information about antenatal care use by 6494 women during their last pregnancy ending in live birth. Antenatal care was considered to be adequate if a woman attended her first visit during the first trimester of pregnancy, made a minimum of four antenatal care visits and underwent at least seven of the eight recommended procedures during visits. We used multivariate ordinal logistic regression to identify correlates of adequate antenatal care and predicted coverage. Findings Based on a population-weighted sample of 9 052 044, 98.4% of women received antenatal care during their last pregnancy, but only 71.5% (95% confidence interval, CI: 69.7 to 73.2) received maternal health care classified as adequate. Significant geographic differences in coverage of care were identified among states. The probability of receiving adequate antenatal care was higher among women of higher socioeconomic status, with more years of schooling and with health insurance. Conclusion While basic antenatal care coverage is high in Mexico, adequate care remains low. Efforts by health systems, governments and researchers to measure and improve antenatal care should adopt a more rigorous definition of care to include important elements of quality such as continuity and processes of care.

Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)452-461
Number of pages10
JournalBulletin of the World Health Organization
Volume94
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Prenatal Care
Mexico
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care
Continuity of Patient Care
Pregnancy
Nutrition Surveys
Live Birth
First Pregnancy Trimester
Health Insurance
Health Surveys
Social Class
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models
Research Personnel
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Medición de la idoneidad de la atención sanitaria prenatal : Un estudio transversal nacional en México. / Heredia-Pi, Ileana; Servan-Mori, Edson; Darney, Blair; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Lozano, Rafael.

In: Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Vol. 94, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 452-461.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heredia-Pi, Ileana ; Servan-Mori, Edson ; Darney, Blair ; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia ; Lozano, Rafael. / Medición de la idoneidad de la atención sanitaria prenatal : Un estudio transversal nacional en México. In: Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2016 ; Vol. 94, No. 6. pp. 452-461.
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