Measuring optical properties of a blood vessel model using optical coherence tomography

David Levitz, Monica Hinds, Noi Tran, Keri Vartanian, Stephen R. Hanson, Steven Jacques

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In this paper we develop the concept of a tissue-engineered optical phantom that uses engineered tissue as a phantom for calibration and optimization of biomedical optics instrumentation. With this method, the effects of biological processes on measured signals can be studied in a well controlled manner. To demonstrate this concept, we attempted to investigate how the cellular remodeling of a collagen matrix affected the optical properties extracted from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the samples. Tissue-engineered optical phantoms of the vascular system were created by seeding smooth muscle cells in a collagen matrix. Four different optical properties were evaluated by fitting the OCT signal to 2 different models: the sample reflectivity ρ and attenuation parameter μ were extracted from the single scattering model, and the scattering coefficient μs and root-mean-square scattering angle θrms were extracted from the extended Huygens-Fresnel model. We found that while contraction of the smooth muscle cells was clearly evident macroscopically, on the microscopic scale very few cells were actually embedded in the collagen. Consequently, no significant difference between the cellular and acellular samples in either set of measured optical properties was observed. We believe that further optimization of our tissue-engineering methods is needed in order to make the histology and biochemistry of the cellular samples sufficiently different from the acellular samples on the microscopic level. Once these methods are optimized, we can better verify whether the optical properties of the cellular and acellular collagen samples differ.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume6078
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
EventPhotonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics II - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 21 2006Jan 24 2006

Other

OtherPhotonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics II
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/21/061/24/06

Fingerprint

Optical tomography
Blood vessels
Collagen
Optical properties
Scattering
Tissue
Muscle
Cells
Biochemistry
Histology
Tissue engineering
Calibration

Keywords

  • Optical Coherence Tomography
  • Scattering
  • Tissue Engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Levitz, D., Hinds, M., Tran, N., Vartanian, K., Hanson, S. R., & Jacques, S. (2006). Measuring optical properties of a blood vessel model using optical coherence tomography. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 6078). [60782B] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.658332

Measuring optical properties of a blood vessel model using optical coherence tomography. / Levitz, David; Hinds, Monica; Tran, Noi; Vartanian, Keri; Hanson, Stephen R.; Jacques, Steven.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6078 2006. 60782B.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Levitz, D, Hinds, M, Tran, N, Vartanian, K, Hanson, SR & Jacques, S 2006, Measuring optical properties of a blood vessel model using optical coherence tomography. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 6078, 60782B, Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics II, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/21/06. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.658332
Levitz D, Hinds M, Tran N, Vartanian K, Hanson SR, Jacques S. Measuring optical properties of a blood vessel model using optical coherence tomography. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6078. 2006. 60782B https://doi.org/10.1117/12.658332
Levitz, David ; Hinds, Monica ; Tran, Noi ; Vartanian, Keri ; Hanson, Stephen R. ; Jacques, Steven. / Measuring optical properties of a blood vessel model using optical coherence tomography. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6078 2006.
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